Book Review: Regeneration by Stacey Berg

Regeneration
An Echo Hunter 367 Novel #2
Stacey Berg
Harper Voyager Impulse, March 2017
ISBN 978-0-06-246614-3
Ebook
Mass Market Paperback coming in April 2017

From the publisher—

The Church has stood for hundreds of years, preserving the sole surviving city in a desert wasteland. When Echo Hunter 367 is sent out past the Church’s farthest outposts, she’s sure it’s a suicide mission. But just when she’s about to give up hope, she finds the impossible – another thriving community, lush and green, with a counsel of leaders who take her in.

Wary of this new society, with ways so different from the only life she’s ever known, Echo is determined to complete her mission and bring hope back to the Church. She’s unsure who she can trust, and must be strong and not be seduced by their clean, fresh water, and plentiful energy sources. If she plays her cards right, she may even still have a chance to save the woman she loves.

Regeneration is one of those books that leave me in the dust a bit because there is so much going on and so many characters to keep straight. That’s not necessarily a bad thing but it does mean I struggled some but, all in all, I liked it for the most part. I will say I think I should have read the first book, Dissension, before tackling this one.

When we first see Echo, she is on the point of death but rescue comes just in time and she wakes in a strange place surrounded by people she doesn’t know. This is initially the most important facet of the story, the need to try to adapt to and work with strangers, people whose lives have been so different.

The other core aspect of Echo’s tale is the need to make choices or, indeed, to NOT make choices. At nearly every turn, Echo is faced with options and they are rarely simple; some, in fact, can lead to major upheavals in her life and in the world she lives in. She’s not the only one facing these dilemmas, though. As two societies learn they are not alone, they must either agree to disagree, if you will, or find ways to coexist and Echo is right at the center of what will be a turning point for these people who have survived the end of civilization as we know it.

Including a love story that nearly consumes Echo, Regeneration is an intense look at human nature when faced with the unknown and I felt compelled to turn the pages to find out what would happen next. I was certainly not prepared for the ending but I think it was almost pre-ordained and was, indeed, fitting.

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, March 2017.

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An Excerpt from Regeneration

Echo Hunter 367 studied the dying woman in the desert with grudging admiration. The woman had walked long past what might reasonably be expected, if that lurching stagger could be called a walk. When she couldn’t walk any more she had crawled, and after that she had dragged herself along, fingers clawing through sand until they clutched some purchase, body scraping over rocks and debris, heedless of the damage. Now and then she made a noise, a purely animal grunt of effort or pain, but she forced herself onward, all the way until the end.

I smell the water.

Desperate as the woman was, she had still been cautious. Though an incalculable distance from any familiar place, she still recognized danger: the wind-borne sand that scoured exposed skin clean to the bone, the predators that stalked patiently in the shadows for prey too weak to flee. The cliff edge that a careless girl could slip over, body suspended in space for the briefest moment before her hands tore through the thornbush, then the long hard fall.

Echo jerked back from that imagined edge. It was her last purposeful movement.  From some great height, she watched herself collapse in the sand. One grasping hand, nails torn, knuckles bloody, landed only a few meters from the spring’s cool water, but she never knew it. For a little while her body twitched in irregular spasms, then those too stilled. Only her lips moved, cracking into a bloody smile. “Lia,” she whispered. “Lia.” Then she fell into the dark.

For a long time there was no sound except water trickling in a death rattle over stones.

Then the high whine of engines scattered the circling predators. Pain returned first, of course. Every inch of skin burned, blistered by sun or rubbed raw by the sand that had worked its way inside the desert-proof clothing. Her muscles ached from too long an effort with no fuel and insufficient water, and her head pounded without mercy. Even the movement of air in and out of her lungs hurt, as if she had inhaled fire. But that pain meant she was breathing, and if she was breathing she still had to fight. With enormous effort she dragged open her eyes, only to meet a blinding brightness. She made a sound, and tasted hot salt as her lips cracked open again. “Shhh,” a soft voice said. “Shhh.” Something cool, smelling of resin and water, settled over her eyes, shielding them from the glare. A cloth dabbed at her mouth, then a finger smoothed ointment over her lips, softening them so they wouldn’t split further when she was finally able to speak. Lia, she thought, letting herself rest in that gentle strength until the pain subsided into manageable inputs. Then she began to take stock.

She lay on something soft, not the rock that had made her bed for so many weeks, although her abused flesh still ached at every pressure point. The air felt cool but still, unlike the probing desert wind, and it carried, beyond the herbal tang, a scent rich and round, unlike the silica sharpness of sand she’d grown so accustomed to. Filtered through the cloth over her eyes, the light seemed diffuse, too dim for the sun. Indoors, then, and not a temporary shelter, but a place with thick walls, and a bed, and someone with sufficient resources to retrieve a dying woman from the desert, and a reason to do so. But what that reason might be eluded her. The Church would never rescue a failure.

Unless the Saint commanded it.

She mustered all her strength and dragged the cloth from her eyes. She blinked away grit until the blurred oval hovering above her took on distinct features, the soft line of the cheek, the gently curving lips. Lia, she thought again, and in her weakness tears washed the vision away. She wiped her eyes with a trembling hand.

And stared into the face of an utter stranger.

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About the Author

Stacey Berg is a medical researcher who writes speculative fiction. Her work as a physician-scientist provides the inspiration for many of her stories. She lives with her wife in Houston and is a member of the Writers’ League of Texas. When she’s not writing, she practices kung fu and runs half marathons.

Visit Stacey Berg on her Website, Goodreads Page, and on Twitter!

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3/29 Guest post @ Books Direct
3/29 Review @ Wall-to-wall books
3/30 Review @ JBronder Book Reviews
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4/01 Review/showcase @ Kara the Redhead

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Book Review: Remote by Lisa Acerbo

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Title: Remote
Author: Lisa Acerbo
Published by: Etopia Press
Publication date: November 20, 2014
Genres: Science Fiction, Dystopia, Romance, Young Adult

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RemoteRemote
Lisa Acerbo
Etopia Press, November 2014
ISBN 978-1-941692-34-9
Ebook

From the publisher—

When technology fulfills every dream, reality becomes a nightmare.

Below the streets of New State, the undergrounders fight to remain free of the technological control of the world above. Every night, Yara risks her life fighting New State’s deadliest weapons, the drones. Half human and half machine, their living half tortured until everything human is gone, the drones have only one objective. Kill. And they do it with exacting precision.

Yara is good at her job and committed to her raids on New State. Until one of those raids brings her face-to-face with Joshua, a New State citizen who doesn’t quite fit her preconceived expectations. After a couple of awkward encounters, he shows her the meaning of hooking up—a computer simulation that allows people to live out their fantasies—without the complication of emotional entanglements or physical reality. But what Yara feels for Joshua is very real. And it’s punishable by law.

As she and Joshua grow closer, she convinces him to leave New State for her underground cause. But as the unrest between New State and the underground escalates, and the drones move in to destroy her world, nothing goes as planned. Families are arrested, loyalties are strained, and Yara’s forced to choose between her people and her feelings. The wrong choice could mean the end of her people, and reality could slip away—forever…

Recently, I’ve been unable to read due to a death in my immediate family. Not only have I been wrapped up in what was going on but I also found I just couldn’t concentrate on any book. Remote is my return to reading and, although I can’t say I did it justice by giving it my full attention, it was a very good re-entry for me.

I’m fond of dystopian fiction as well as science fiction in general and Remote is a worthy representative of the subgenre and genre respectively. Ms. Acerbo has conceived a really good scenario and carries it forward with a strong plot full of possibilities and excitement and her characters are as engaging as any I’ve seen before. Yara and Josh are an appealing duo with a connection that grows quite naturally and I was also attached to Mason and Yara’s parents. If there’s any flaw in Ms. Acerbo’s character development, it’s that the great majority of secondary characters have no real fullness to them.

New State is frightening but, as the author leads us to understand, this world is not an impossibility. We see today how people, especially the younger generations, are wedded to technology to the detriment of society in a number of ways. Perhaps we won’t go so far as to create the horrendous drones in this story but there is much here that could become reality.

Strictly speaking, this book doesn’t end on a cliffhanger but there clearly will be a sequel or, at least , I certainly hope so. I’ll be looking out for it to find out how the rebels’ war with New State will progress.

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, February 2015.

About the Author

Lisa AcerboLisa Acerbo is a high school teacher and holds an EdD in Educational Leadership. She lives in Connecticut with her husband, daughters, three cats, and horse. She is the author of Apocalipstick and has contributed to local newspapers, news and travel blogs including “The Patch” and “Hollywood Scriptwriter”.

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Book Review: The Omega Project by Steve Alten

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Title: The Omega Project
Author: Steve Alten
Published by: Tor/Forge
Publication Date: August 6, 2013
Genre: Post-apocalyptic, Science Fiction

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The Omega ProjectThe Omega Project
Steve Alten
Forge, August 2013
ISBN 978-0-7653-3632-3
Hardcover

From the publisher—

On the brink of a disaster that could end all human life on earth, tech genius Robert Eisenbraun joins a team of scientists in Antarctica on a mission to Jupiter’s moon Europa to mine a rare ore that would provide for Earth’s long-term energy needs. But as he and the rest of the team train under the ice shelf in preparation for the long journey, trouble erupts, and before they embark Eisenbraun is the odd man out, put into cold sleep against his will….

When Robert wakes, he finds the ship deserted and not functional. He escapes to the surface of an Earth terribly changed. The plan has gone horribly wrong, but as he adapts to a hostile environment, he realizes that there is still a way to accomplish what his mission had set out to achieve. But he also discovers that he faces a new adversary of the most unlikely sort. For now,  his own survival and that of the woman whose love has sustained him in his darkest hours depend on the defeat of a technological colossus partly of his own making. Confronting a foe that knows him almost as well as he knows himself, he faces the prospect of depending on resources that he has reason to believe will be available on one particular night of a full moon, a night foretold by a mysterious unseen ally to be a pivotal moment for the fate of the earth. The game has changed, and Earth’s future depends on him and him alone.

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I’ve been a fan of Steve Alten for a number of years, since I first read MEG, probably in 2005 or so. None of his succeeding books have evoked quite the terror and sheer creepiness that one did but all have had certain qualities that keep me coming back for more and The Omega Project has kept up the tradition.

A few elements of this book bothered me somewhat, especially the lack of worldbuilding regarding the Great Die-off and the quick jump from one story arc to another. In fact, there may be too many ideas so that none seem to be fully explored but I still enjoyed the overall concept. In particular, I’m always won over by man’s insertion into a world so vastly different from ours and Robert’s finding himself on an Earth of the very distant future was quite engaging. However, I have to say the overdone preachiness left me cold and had me skipping pages.

I can’t claim to be a hard-core science fiction reader since I find some of it inaccessible because of an overabundance of scientific fact and/or theory that I don’t want or understand well or because it’s too heavy on the military theme. I like the kind that just offers a cracking good story with well-crafted character and plot development and strong worldbuilding. With some reservations, particularly regarding worldbuilding, moralizing and pacing, The Omega Project misses the mark a bit but is still enjoyable. I’ll be interested in seeing where Mr. Alten turns his attention next.

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, October 2013.

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About the Author

Steve AltenSteve Alten earned his Bachelors degree at Penn State University, a Masters Degree in Sports Medicine from the University of Delaware, and a Doctorate of Education at Temple University. Struggling to support his family of five, he decided to pen a novel he had been thinking about for years. Working late nights and on weekends, he eventually finished MEG; A Novel of Deep Terror, a thriller about Carcharodon megalodon, the 70-foot prehistoric cousin of the great white shark. MEG went on to become an international best-seller, with movie rights sold. The Mayan Calendar plays a big part in his Domain series — another international best-seller sold in the U.K. as THE MAYAN PROPHECY series. Steve’s other work includes The LOCH — a modern-day thriller about the Loch Ness Monster, The SHELL GAME — about the end of oil and the next 9/11 event, and GRIM REAPER: End of Days — a modern-day Dante’s Inferno which takes place in New York when a man-made plague strikes Manhattan. His best work yet, THE OMEGA PROJECT – was released in August 2013. As an author, Steve has two goals. First, to continue to work hard to become a better storyteller and create exciting page turning thrillers. Second, to remain accessible to his readers. Steve reads and answers all e-mails, uses the names and descriptions of his loyal fans as characters in all his novels, and even hires readers as editors, depending on their particular expertise.

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Book Review: The Golden Couple by Stephanie Karpinske

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Title: The Golden Couple
Author: Stephanie Karpinske
Release date: February 23, 2013
Genre:  Science Fiction/Romance/Thriller
Age Group: Young Adult

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The Golden CoupleThe Golden Couple
The Samantha Project Series, #2
Stephanie Karpinske
Crazy Dream Publishing, February 2013
ISBN 978-0-9887524-1-2
Trade Paperback

From the author—

In this action-packed second installment of The Samantha Project series, Samantha and Erik go on a search to find a way to save themselves from the genetic time bomb ticking away in their cells. Along the way, they discover a shocking secret–one they wish they were never told!

Although Samantha’s boyfriend, Colin, is back now, her feelings for Erik are getting stronger by the minute. It isn’t long before she finally learns the real reason why she can’t resist Erik. But only after she’s gone too far with him! So far that Colin may never forgive her.

GlobalLife Genetics continues to pursue Samantha and they’ll stop at nothing to get her. Sam still doesn’t understand what GlobalLife’s plan is for her but she knows it’s something big. And she knows it isn’t good.

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If you’re new to this series, you’ll want to read The Samantha Project first. That will increase your enjoyment of The Golden Couple considerably because you’ll be much more in tune with Sam and her friends as well as her enemies and with what’s going on. You don’t have to read it first, certainly, but I really do recommend it, especially since the action picks up right after the end of the first book.

My review of The Samantha Project can be found here.

Sam and her friends are on the run but also determined to find out the truth about Sam’s and Erik’s existence but what they discover is almost beyond belief. This devastating truth explains a lot of why GlobalLife Genetics is so bent on capturing them but, as it turns out, they still have a lot to learn about GlobalLife’s real intentions for both Erik and Sam and for the future of humanity. Fortunately for these two, they are not alone in their search for answers—and survival.

Genetic manipulation is a science that could so easily be corrupted that the core story here is not impossible to foresee (although an element of the plot is “out there”). Samantha is an intriguing character, particularly because of her intelligence and fortitude, and she has become one of those MCs I want to spend more time with. Her relationships with Colin and Erik are believable and, to me, have much more substance than many of the love triangles found in young adult fiction these days. The rest of her group are not quite as well fleshed out but I still felt a connection to all of them and the people on the GlobalLife side are as cold-blooded as you could want in your villains.

Ms. Karpinske caught my attention with the first book in this series and has done it again with The Golden Couple. Since she has left her readers with some really intense questions, I guess I’m just going to have to go read the third entry, A Chosen Destiny.

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, June 2013.

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About the Author

Stephanie KarpinskeA former editor for a publishing company, Stephanie Karpinske has worked on several bestselling nonfiction books. Now she freelances full-time, writing for a variety of books and national magazines. The Samantha Project is her debut YA novel and is the first in The Samantha Project series, followed by The Golden Couple. Stephanie lives in Des Moines, Iowa.

Author social media links:

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Book Review: The Game by Shane Scollins

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The Game
by Shane Scollins
Release Date: 03/13/13

THE GAME is a mystery/thriller with an unpredictable paranormal twist. It has action and

adventure and plays up the everyday exploitation of reality television obsession gone wrong.

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The GameThe Game
Shane Scollins
Limitless Publishing, March 2013
ISBN 978-0615783475
Trade Paperback

From the publisher—

No matter where you are, they’ll find you, and put you in “The GAME”.

Candice Laguna’s life is being systematically dismantled, by an unknown force, for a reason she can’t imagine. But she is about to become the unwilling star of a reality game competition the likes of which has never been broadcast to the world.

Just when things get darkest, a mysterious man snatches her from the grips of doom. He is a man who is not what he appears, and not who he says. He has no name and his motivation to help Candice is not what it seems to be.

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Sigh. Where do I begin?

Well, first of all, I have no idea why this is labeled young adult. There is nothing young adult about it unless you count the dreaded insta-love aspect. All of the characters involved are old enough to be out in the working world, living on their own, with car loans, healthy bank accounts and adult jobs. No young adults here.

The Game starts out beautifully as a psychological thriller. This part is really good with the realistic tale of what can happen when a sociopath has the technological ability to manipulate a person’s life and it all seems very possible.  I was completely engaged…but then it just sort of fizzles with the game only lasting one round before all the captive participants are rescued.

The introduction of the paranormal element could have been really interesting but, instead, it struck me as overly convoluted—I still have no clear idea of why this demented form of time travel is happening and, in the end, I felt as though I had read incomplete portions of two different books. Either plot on its own could be really strong if fleshed out more but they just don’t work together.  I also feel the romance seems forced, almost as if the author thought he had to add it because the readers would expect it, but it just isn’t very believable.

In a departure from so many other books, the protagonists and secondary “good” characters are kind of thinly drawn while the villains are clear and consistent and I believed in their menace. Rena, in particular, sticks out in my mind because she’s so amoral and, in a way, more evil than either Angus or Caleb. I have a pretty good understanding of Candice and Vince and, to a lesser extent, Zee, but I do wish the author had given us much more time with Alexis.

On a positive (to me) note, the construction of this novel is very well done with only a handful of incorrect words which I believe occurred only because Spellcheck won’t catch the inappropriate spelling of a word that has multiple correct spellings. I notice these because I’m just geared that way but many readers won’t and the author is technically good at what he does (and perhaps has a strong editor).

In the final analysis, Shane Scollins is a talented writer with some good ideas but the combination of mystery thriller and paranormal falls short this time. The Game ends with a clear opening for a sequel and I’ll be interested to see where the story goes next—and I hope to see this author’s work on other platforms rather than just Amazon.

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, April 2013.

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About the Author

Shane ScollinsShane Scollins is a freelance writer and author. Originally from New Jersey, he now resides in Upstate New York with his wife, Heather. He has worked as an automotive service manager, a website developer and a computer network engineer. Primarily a science fiction and paranormal novelist, Shane enjoys taking readers on surprising and unexpected journeys that twist reality. He is currently working on his next book.

Follow Shane at:


Website * Twitter * Goodreads * Facebook

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Book Review: The Samantha Project by Stephanie Karpinske

The Samantha ProjectThe Samantha Project
Stephanie Karpinske
Crazy Dream Publishing, December 2012
ISBN 978-0-9887524-0-5
Trade Paperback

From the author—

Seventeen-year-old Samantha Andrews has a seemingly perfect life; great parents, early admission to Stanford, and her quarterback boyfriend, Colin. But a shocking secret from her past turns her world upside down. Samantha discovers she’s part of a global corporation’s genetic enhancement project. And just as she’s learning what these enhanced genes can do, the corporation decides they want her, and the technology hidden inside her, back! 

During a heart-pounding race to flee from her pursuers, she encounters Erik, another person who was part of the experimental project. He’s tall, blond, tan and he can read her thoughts!! Together, they’re both in danger and a rogue scientist discovers yet another secret lies inside them.

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Finding a young adult science fiction novel that’s fresh and interesting is not always such an easy thing to do but Stephanie Karpinske is on the right path with The Samantha Project, albeit with a few flaws. On the mildly negative side, I found Sam and her parents to be Pollyanna-ish and Sam is that goody two-shoes everybody sneers at in high school. There were moments when the three of them made me roll my eyes but, when you get right down to it, I suppose you could say their sappy behavior highlights the contrast with the changes that will begin to happen in Sam’s life and to Sam herself. The other characters that got on my nerves were the bad guys who were rather shallow and sterotypical bad guys, almost a parody of Men in Black. They are menacing but not nearly as threatening as they could be.

The other problem I had was with the REALLY slow pacing of the story in the first half of the book. The author takes much too long with the set-up and I might have given up if I hadn’t found the plot described in the synopsis intriguing and then the momentum starts to pick up. I also began to really like Samantha after a life-altering event when she begins to seem far more like a normal teen although with certain enhancements, so to speak. The girl is forced into a fast maturity but she doesn’t shy away from what must be done and her innate intelligence and fortitude comes to the fore at last.

Except for Samantha’s parents and the bad guys, I did enjoy the other characters, especially Dave and Jack, and in a rare instance of a romantic triangle being interesting (to me), I like that the reader can’t be sure from one moment to the next whether there really IS a romantic triangle. That uncertainty is heightened by the fact that both Colin and Erik are very appealing, although in distinctly different ways. The one evil-doer that stands out in the crowd, Alden Worthings, makes up for the meh-ness of his henchmen and I couldn’t help being engaged when he was on the page. Perhaps the most interesting character of all, however, is Brittany, a girl whose life is completely uprooted through no fault of her own; she personifies the unfairness of life.

So, the moral of *my* story here is, don’t let the slowness of the first half of The Samantha Project keep you from reading on. You’ll be surprised—and happy—to see the stakes get higher and the action take off, leading to a kick-butt Chapter 36. It’s a good thing we don’t have to wait for the next book because The Golden Couple is already out and the third book, A Chosen Destiny, should be released soon.

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, April 2013.

Book Review: There Comes a Prophet by David Litwack

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There Comes a Prophet by David Litwack
Publication date: July 9th 2012
by Double Dragon Publishing
Genre: YA Dystopian
 
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There Comes a ProphetThere Comes a Prophet
David Litwack
Double Dragon Publishing, July 2012
ISBN 978-1-55404-996-7
Ebook
ISBN 978-1-77115-014-9
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From the publisher—

Who among us will cast aside a comfortable existence and risk death to follow a dream?

A world kept peaceful for a thousand years by the magic of the ruling vicars. But a threat lurks from a violent past. Wizards from the darkness have hidden their sorcery in a place called the keep and left a trail of clues that have never been solved.

Nathaniel has grown up longing for more but unwilling to challenge the vicars. Until his friend Thomas is taken for a teaching, the mysterious coming-of-age ritual. Thomas returns but with his dreams ripped away. When Orah is taken next, Nathaniel tries to rescue her and ends up in the prisons of Temple City. There he meets the first keeper of the ancient clues. But when he seeks the keep, what he finds is not magic at all.

If he reveals the truth, the words of the book of light might come to pass:

“If there comes among you a prophet saying ‘Let us return to the darkness,’ you shall stone him, because he has sought to thrust you away from the light.”

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High fantasy, the kind with a quest, is not on my list of things I really like to read and, yet, here I am, about to share my thoughts on There Comes a Prophet. Is it high fantasy? No, not at all, but it is most certainly a quest. This quest takes three teens on a search for humanity’s past which should have been its present and future. For about a thousand years, people have lived in the modern version of the Dark Ages, and have lost all curiosity, all interest in developing technology, all inclination to dream of what might lie beyond. Much of this has been perpetuated by the ruling class of vicars who suppress all independent thought and behavior. Interestingly, this is not really religious tyranny so much as the evolution of, well, I’ll say no more about that for fear of spoilers.

Then, as you might expect, a “prophet” rises, a young man who has dreams in defiance of the vicars. Nathaniel is no daring hero, though, and keeps his dreams to himself until he’s driven to protect his friends. In doing so, he comes to learn about what might have been and what he must do to bring “darkness” back to the people. Nathaniel and his friends, Orah and Thomas, set off on what will become a great adventure.

In the end, the most important player might be a man named Kiran.

I found a couple of things very intriguing about this story. Most important, there were aspects of these teens that I didn’t care for. In simple terms—

Nathaniel…ineffectual

Orah…bitchy

Thomas…whiny

In spite of this, I actually did like these kids, perhaps because they weren’t so SHINY as many young adult characters are and there’s much more to them than these shallow impressions. The other thing I appreciated is the author’s creation of a good versus evil theme that is not at all like the usual. Just imagine how different things might be in our world if factions in power could bring themselves to true compromise.

There are certainly some flaws to be found in this story. The teachings are a form of brainwashing but seem to be too mild and short-lived to have the crippling effects we see in Thomas and there is little real tension or sense of danger in their search for the Keep. In fact, there’s no tension in the requisite romance either and I really think this novel might be better suited to the middle-grade reader rather than young adult. I also have to say I don’t like the cover because it’s too dark to see it clearly online.

When all is said and done, David Litwack is an accomplished author with a good story and I expect we’ll be seeing much more of him in the future.

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, March 2013.

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AUTHOR BIO
David LitwackThe urge to write first struck when working on a newsletter at a youth encampment in the woods of northern Maine. It may have been the night when lightning flashed at sunset followed by northern lights rippling after dark. Or maybe it was the newsletter’s editor, a girl with eyes the color of the ocean. But David Litwack was inspired to write about the blurry line between reality and the fantastic.

Using two fingers and lots of white-out, he religiously typed five pages a day throughout college and well into his twenties. Then life intervened. He paused to raise two sons and pursue a career, in the process becoming a well-known entrepreneur in the software industry, founding several successful companies. When he found time again to daydream, the urge to write returned. There Comes a Prophet is his first  novel in this new stage of life.

David and his wife split their time between Cape Cod, Florida and anywhere else that catches their fancy. He no longer limits himself to five pages a day and is thankful every keystroke for the invention of the word processor.

Author Links:
David’s Website / Goodreads / Facebook / Twitter

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