Book Review: The Nine by C.G. Harris

Audiobook Tour: The Nine by C.G. Harris

 

************

Author: C.G. Harris

Narrator: MacLeod Andrews

Series: The Judas Files, Book 1

Length: 6 hours 53 minutes

Publisher: Hot Chocolate Press

Released: Oct. 15, 2019

Genre: Urban Fantasy

************

In the Inferno, Dante almost got it right…

Nine circles of hell, each one worse than the last. For Gabe, all of hell
is level nine, where the real baddies endure subzero climates and
have their nether regions cradled in cryogenic underwear.

Gabe has carved out his own safe niche in this Arctic afterlife with his
successful black-market business. When Judas Iscariot makes him an
offer he doesn’t dare refuse, Gabe must leave behind his contraband
Twinkies and Dr. Pepper to become a double agent for the most dangerous
organization the world has never heard of and save humanity before it’s too late…

************


************

Buy Links

Buy on Audible

************

C.G. Harris is an award winning science-fiction and fantasy author from Colorado who draws inspiration from favorites, Jim Butcher, Richard Kadrey and Brandon Sanderson. For nearly a decade, Harris has escaped the humdrum of the real world by creating fictional characters and made-up realities. When not writing, Harris enjoys sipping scotch while watching the twisted humor of Drunk History. Seeing our past through the bottom of a whisky glass is more entertaining than reading a dusty textbook. C.G. Harris is the pen name and combined persona created by authors, Chuck Harrelson and Kerrie Flanagan. Together they have published, The Judas Files, a gritty urban fantasy series and The Rax, an apocalyptic science fiction series.

WebsiteTwitterFacebook

************

Narrator Bio

MacLeod Andrews is a multiple Audie, Earphone, and SOVAS award winning audiobook narrator, as well as an award winning film actor and producer. He’s perhaps most recognized in audio for narrating the Sandman Slim series by Richard Kadrey and The Reckoners series by Brandon Sanderson. His films They Look Like People and The Siren have played festivals all around the world and are available for streaming on major platforms domestically and abroad. He has a cat named Luna, a well known affinity for chocolate chip cookies, and rations his social media fix to twitter.

WebsiteTwitter

************

 

https://i0.wp.com/dabofdarkness.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Review-2-1-e1498331259195.png?w=307&ssl=1

You might not think the nine circles of hell could be amusing, even hilarious, but I gotta tell ya, The Nine had me practically guffawing and I imagine other drivers on the road must have thought a loony was behind my wheel. Gabe and Alex are full of snark and charm and all the good things that make me like characters mixed with a bit of whatever it was that got them in Hell in the first place and I love them both.

So, Gabe is a guy who’s really good at working the black market and there are a lot of folks in Hell who miss stuff from above, like Twinkies. Searching out the goods takes a bit of effort and time but, when he comes across an amnesiac damsel in distress during a firestorm, he calls her “Stray” and takes her in. She showed up just in time to watch the shop while he goes to a meeting he dare not refuse with Judas Iscariot who assigns him to infiltrate the Judas Agency, a group that’s nefarious even by Hell’s standards. That’s when he meets the badass Alex who really gives Gabe a run for his money and, despite all the picking at each other, these two were obviously meant for each other. Can Gabe stop a contagion that will nearly wipe out humanity without Alex finding out?

Narrator MacLeod Andrews bears major responsibility for making this so much fun and that has a lot to do with two things, his distinctive voices and his interpretations of who these people are. Of all the personalities, I think I liked Alex the best but, truly, all of them kept me listening. Great job, Mr. Andrews!

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, November 2019.

************

Nov. 19th:

Dab of Darkness Book Reviews

Nov. 20th:

Viviana MacKade

Southern Girl Bookaholic

Nov. 21st:

Buried Under Books

Nov. 22nd:

Nesie’s Place

4 the Love of Audiobooks

Nov. 23rd:

Valerie Ullmer | Romance Author

Eileen Troemel

Nov. 24th:

Jazzy Book Reviews

Nov. 25th:

The Book Addict’s Reviews

Plugging you into the audio community since 2016.

Sign up as a tour host here.

Book Reviews: The Heist by Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg, The Walnut Tree by Charles Todd, and Masaryk Station by David Downing

The HeistThe Heist
Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg
Bantam, June 2013
ISBN: 978-0-345-54304-23
Hardcover

I found this novel to be superficial.  The press release accompanying it says, among other things, that it is filled with “popcorn thrills.” I find it doubtful that it would make a good movie or television episode.  Why it took two talented, best-selling authors to write it leads one to scratch his/her head in wonder.

It would appear that FBI Special Agent Kate O’Hare was created hopefully as another heroine like the popular Stephanie Plum character from another Evanovich series.  Not even close.  She is a shallow personality full of clichés, as is the novel itself.  The plot is simple (no pun intended):  Kate captures a con man, Nick Fox, only to see him released by her superiors to propagate a bigger con to capture a fugitive financier who stole $500,000 and is secreted on an Indonesian island. To make matters worse, Kate is partnered with Nick in an attempt to capture Fox, recover the money and return him to the United States for arrest.  Of course the whole operation, including the kidnapping, is illegal (but then is the FBI or the U.S. government free from such accusations?).

On a positive note, the writing is smooth and the reading is easy.  Enough said.

Reviewed by Ted Feit, September 2013.

———————————————————-

The Walnut TreeThe Walnut Tree
Charles Todd
Morrow Paperbacks, October 2013
ISBN:  978-0-06-223687-6
Trade Paperback

A change of pace for this mother-son author team:  A love story, rather than a mystery.  But still set at the start of World War I, with insights into the British class system and the horrors of war. It is the story of Lady Elspeth Douglas, torn between the attractions of two men, duty, and the iron hand of her guardian stifling her independent nature.

Just before the outbreak of war, Elspeth is in Paris, at the behest of her pregnant friend who is awaiting the birth of her first child. After the baby’s birth and the German invasion, she attempts to return to England.  Along the way she voluntarily becomes involved in the hostilities, bringing water to the troops.  There she meets Captain Peter Gilchrist, setting up an emotional conflict with her fiancé, Alain, to whom she sort of became betrothed the night before he left to join the army.  When she gets back to England, she decides to become a nurse, and serves well in France, until her guardian decides that that is not an activity fit for a lady.

The Walnut Tree is an emotional tale from several points of view. And it is told without embellishment, simply and in a straightforward manner. And the writers couldn’t resist introducing a mystery, even if only in passing.

Recommended.

Reviewed by Ted Feit, October 2013.

———————————————————-

Masaryk StationMasaryk Station
David Downing
Soho Crime, June 2013
ISBN: 978-1-616-95223-5
Hardcover

With this, the sixth novel in the John Russell series, David Downing brings to a finale the chronicle covering the years between the World Wars, those following the collapse of Nazi Germany.   It has been quite a journey, with Russell having served as a double agent for both the Soviets and Americans, certainly as dangerous as an existence can be.  Each of the novels reflected the times and the clashes of the ideological differences between the two countries.

In the final book, the story of a divided Germany and Berlin is recounted, ending with the seeds that were sown in the fall of the Soviet Empire.  At the same time, the personal conflicts that beset Russell and others who at first embraced and then questioned socialism are explored and analyzed.

Each entry in the series was well-crafted to not only tell a gripping story of our times, but to call to mind the era as portrayed by real-life characters.  It has been an excellently told saga.  (It is unfortunate that the latest volume suffers from poor production, editing and proofreading, riddled with typographical and grammatical errors.)  Next spring, we are promised a new series by the author moving back in time to World War I.

My parenthetical criticism notwithstanding, the novel is recommended.

Reviewed by Ted Feit, November 2013.