Book Review: Blood on the Chesapeake by Randy Overbeck @OverbeckRandy @WildRosePress

Blood on the Chesapeake
The Haunted Shores Mysteries #1
Randy Overbeck
The Wild Rose Press, April 2019
ISBN 978-1509223282
Trade Paperback

History teacher/coach Darrell Henshaw has taken a new job in a small town on the Chesapeake Bay. An unwanted shock comes when the first thing he sees as he approaches the high school is a naked young black man on the widows walk outside his office. No one else admits to seeing him, although, to Darrell’s dismay, there are rumors of a ghost. It’s said the ghost is that of a high school boy back in the sixties who committed suicide.

This is not Darrell’s first experience with the occult and an episode in his past proved that to ignore the sighting is the wrong thing to do. Soon the ghost begins visiting him, pleading for his help. The ghost says he was murdered and needs Darrell to prove it using clues provided to him to bring the perpetrators to justice. Darrell, with the help of a charming young woman he meets, figures he has no choice but to do as the ghost asks, especially since there are peculiar things going on in the school and in the town. He soon finds it isn’t the ghost he has to fear, but the living.

The racism of the sixties is front and center in this story, with effects that linger into the nineties when the action is set. It’s a sad story, too often true of the day–although the ghost is a twist. I found the story a bit predictable, and the big, ample breasts bouncing on practically every woman’s chest rather annoying. But if you like ghost stories, this one carries through to a satisfactory conclusion.

Reviewed by Carol Crigger, July 2019.
https://carolcriggercom.sitelio.me/
Author of Five Days, Five Dead, Hereafter and Hometown Homicide.

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Book Review: Dreamscape Adventures, Inc. by C.A. Gray @AuthorCAGray @AnAudiobookworm

Audiobook Tour: Dreamscape Adventures, Inc. by C.A. Gray

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Author: C.A. Gray

Narrator: Matthew E. Berry

Length: 6 hours and 16 minutes

Publisher: Wanderlust Publishing

Released: July 17, 2019

Genre: Fantasy, Magical Realism


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Workaholic insurance attorney Luke Darringer has it all: money, looks, ambition. Sure, he hasn’t taken a vacation in over a decade, and his personal life is almost nonexistent – but that’s a small price to pay in order to maintain strict control, and minimize his vulnerabilities.

But then Luke’s firm, with the help of his cheeky administrative assistant Charlotte, strong-arms him into becoming the first-ever client of the new Dreamscape Adventures, Inc. The new company promises fantastical vacations to wealthy clients, as well as controlled therapeutic experiences to individuals suffering from various forms of mental illness, such as autism and PTSD. They’re a potentially huge client for Luke’s firm, but they need liability insurance before they can get off the ground. Luke expects he’ll have a quick little canyoneering adventure like he did back in his college days, and then get right back to the grindstone.

But Luke’s adventure doesn’t quite go the way he planned. Eli, the entrepreneur in charge, assures Luke that the glitches are nothing to worry about, and they’ll have things under control again in no time. Instead, Luke soon finds himself in a wilderness of questionable reality, where he is responsible not only for his own safety, but also Charlotte’s, Eli’s, and that of a nonverbal autistic boy whose vulnerability strikes a bit too close to home. Forced to confront his past and his deepest fears, Luke must decide whether to rewrite history and become the man he’s always wanted to be – or whether instead he is doomed to repeat it.

Buy Links

Buy on Amazon


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By day, C.A. Gray is a Naturopathic Medical Doctor (NMD) with a primary care practice in Tucson, AZ, and she writes medical books under her real name (Dr. Lauren Deville). She lives with her husband, with whom she maintains a facetiously contentious movie review blog, and travels as often as they can get away. When not writing or seeing patients, she does yoga, drinks red wine while eating dark chocolate, and consumes audiobooks like there’s no tomorrow!

WebsiteTwitterFacebookGoodreadsInstagram

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Narrator Bio

Matthew has been very active in his career as a radiologic technologist, but something was nagging at him. His urging to be involved with the written word. The medical journals he wrote did not fill the desire for the kind of words he wanted to be a part of. He had always considered himself a writer. But one that often had difficulties completing the story. So, how else could he be involved? Matthew began listening to audiobooks and decided in 2017 that he was going to give it a try.

He now has 9 audiobook projects on sale at Amazon, Audible, and iTunes with two projects in the works.

TwitterFacebookInstagramSoundcloud

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I’ve been enjoying Ms. Gray’s audiobooks for a while now so tackling this one was a given but I actually had another reason for wanting to read it. Back in the day, when I was in the corporate world, my career was very much like Luke’s except that I wasn’t an attorney. I was an insurance casualty underwriter, tasked with deciding whether my company would agree to insure a particular client, and that frequently involved my visiting to see the operations for myself. Mind you, we didn’t deal with entertainment or high tech but the core process is pretty much the same.

That said, my predisposition to like this book was spot on. At the same time, I was surprised at what the story turned out to be because I was expecting something like a high tension thriller when, in fact, it’s more of a look at how life shapes a person and what forces come into play in our personal growth once we allow ourselves to be open to change and to face our pasts. This is no boring psychological study, though; watching Luke get the benefit of what Dreamscape Adventures has to offer is heightened by a fast-paced adventure with plenty of twists to keep you guessing.

Matthew E. Berry is a new narrator to me and I found him quite accomplished with different voices (including female) and he helped me connect to the characters. His pacing and his dramatic intonations were also good and, for me, he was a real asset to the story.

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, August 2019.

I received this audiobook as part of my participation in a blog tour with Audiobookworm Promotions. The tour is being sponsored by C.A. Gray. The gifting of this audiobook did not affect my opinion of it.

Giveaway

Giveaway: $25 Amazon Gift Card

Dreamscape Adventures, Inc. Giveaway: $25 Amazon Gift Card

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Aug. 27th:

Viviana MacKade

Nesie’s Place

Aug. 28th:

Hall Ways Blog

The Book Junkie Reads . . .

Aug. 29th:

Valerie Ullmer | Romance Author

Dab of Darkness Audiobook Reviews

T’s Stuff

Crossroad Reviews

Aug. 30th:

Buried Under Books

Country Road Reviews

What Is That Book About

Aug. 31st:

Momma Says To Read or Not to Read

My Creatively Random Life

Audiobook Ebook Fascination

Sep. 1st:

Jazzy Book Reviews

Lynn’s Romance Enthusiasm

Sep. 2nd:

Locks, Hooks and Books

The Book Addict’s Reviews

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Book Review: Mind Games by Shana Silver @shanasilver @SwoonReads /@MacmillanUSA @XpressoTours

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Mind Games
Shana Silver
Published by: Swoon Reads
Publication date: August 27th 2019
Genres: Romance, Science Fiction, Young Adult

A teen programmer at a school for geniuses must join forces with a boy she can’t remember to stop a hacker from deleting their memories in Shana Silver’s action-packed YA debut, Mind Games.

Arden sells memories. Whether it’s becoming homecoming queen or studying for that all important test, Arden can hack into a classmate’s memories and upload the experience for you just as if you’d lived it yourself. Business is great, right up until the day Arden whites out, losing fifteen minutes of her life and all her memories of the boy across the school yard. The boy her friends assure her she’s had a crush on for years.

Arden realizes that her own memories have been hacked, but they haven’t just been stolen and shared… they’ve been removed. And she’s not the only one: her mysterious crush, Sebastian, has lost ALL of his memories. But how can they find someone who has the power to make them forget everything they’ve learned?

Goodreads / Amazon / Barnes & Noble
 iBooks / Kobo / Google Play

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Just imagine if all your memories could be saved so that you could enjoy them time and time again. The fear of Alzheimer’s would be lessened and you could choose which memories you want to relive and when. Is that a great idea or is it perhaps at least a little creepy?

Then take it a step further and the creepiness really comes into play. Arden is an exceedingly bright and talented girl surrounded by other students almost as intelligent and creative as she is—this is, after all, a school that focuses on STEM—and she has figured a way to hack into the HiveMind, which happens to be her father’s brilliant creation. Arden sells memories to people who don’t own them and, while this may often be relatively harmless, at times it leads to some pretty unacceptable results. Let’s say, for instance, that Amy is in competition with Brad on a test and Brad buys Connie’s photographic memories of the book that’s the subject of the test. Not fair, right?

Then Arden gets her comeuppance, you might say, when some of her own memories suddenly disappear and her friend Sebastian is in an even worse way. These memories aren’t just temporarily missing, they’re actually gone and, oddly enough, Arden’s and Sebastian’s collaborative senior project seems to be involved. They can’t actually remember the project but the more they look into what it was about, the more ominous the truth becomes.

There’s a twist resolution that I couldn’t quite buy into but, on the whole, I had a good time with Mind Games and I’m interested to see what Ms. Silver does with The Con Code, coming out next year.

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, August 2019.

About the Author

Rachel Shane (writing as Shana Silver) studied creative writing at Syracuse University. She’s been a computer animator, an e-book creator for a major publisher, and now works as a Project Manager in digital and TV advertising where she enjoys telling people what to do. She lives in New Jersey with her husband, young daughter, and the characters she dreams up.

Website / Goodreads / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

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Follow the tour here.

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GIVEAWAY!

Tour-wide giveaway (US only)
Print copy of Mind Games

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Book Review: The Huntress by Kate Quinn @KateQuinnAuthor @WmMorrowBooks

The Huntress
Kate Quinn
William Morrow, February 2019
ISBN 978-0-06-274037-3
Trade Paperback

In this terrific novel by Kate Quinn we meet three remarkable people. Jordon McBride, an American teenager, who dreams of one day becoming a renowned photographer. Nina Markova, a young resourceful Russian whose mission in life is to become a pilot, and Ian Graham, a British reporter covering the second world war and who at its end turns his attention to hunting down Nazi war criminals.

Each of their stories unfold in alternating chapters (a powerful way to heighten tension) and, as we move from the Second World War to the early 1950’s, we see Jordon struggle to fulfil her dream, frustrated in a time when young women are expected to find a suitable husband and start a family. We also follow Nina who, after joining an elite flying group targeting the Nazis, is shot down in enemy territory. She manages to avoid capture but, ultimately when the war ends, feels lost and alone, unsure what the future will bring. And Ian who soon becomes obsessed with finding one particular war criminal known as the Huntress, a German woman, responsible for the brutal murder of a number of innocent people including children and Ian’s younger brother.

These characters are all vividly drawn, with varying strengths and skills, and as their stories start to come together, tension quickly escalates and they find themselves in a race to apprehend the Huntress before she vanishes.

I had a hard time putting this book down. It’s a wonderful novel with drama and humour and thrills and a cast of characters you can’t help but like and root for.

In the Author’s Notes at the end of The Huntress you also find out how the Author conceived the idea and also learn that some of the characters are based on real people and real events. I highly recommend The Huntress. Check it out you won’t regret it…

Reviewed by guest reviewer Moyra Tarling, July 2019.

No News Is No News

Returning guest blogger Sunny Frazier, whose first novel in the Christy Bristol Astrology Mysteries, Fools Rush In, received the Best Novel Award from Public Safety Writers Association, is here today to share her thoughts about how it’s more important now than ever to be aware of the news.

The third Christy Bristol Astrology Mystery, A Snitch in Time, is in bookstores now.

sunny69@comcast.net   //  http://www.sunnyfrazier.com

My sister recently got rid of her TV and cancelled her newspaper subscription. It’s her drastic reaction to all the bad news bombarding us. She doesn’t want to know about madmen using malls and Walmart as shooting galleries. How many U.S. soldiers were killed in the Middle East this week? She keeps the war at arm’s length. The reemergence of measles, West Nile and Ebola, climate change, the Amazon burning, it’s all just more bad news.

   

And it’s not just my sister pulling away from the media. I’ve had many friends tell me “I stopped watching the news.” I think it’s a strategy to keep hopelessness at bay. “It can’t happen to me, it can’t happen here” is a mantra proven wrong every day. Ignoring the fact that this is the world we currently live in is a fantasy to fight fear.

There have been many times in my life where I haven’t had access to TV or newspapers. When I left home and lived in a crappy studio apartment in Los Angeles, I couldn’t afford either. When I joined the Navy, newspapers weren’t delivered to the barracks. Stationed in Puerto Rico there were no newspapers or English-speaking radio and TV. We didn’t find out that Nixon stepped down until sailors brought us news from the states. We have a new president? Good to know who’s your Commander-in-Chief.

I didn’t have TV or newspapers during college (even as a journalism major!). I started to watch local news while working for the sheriff’s department because we were often in the news. Fun to see co-workers at crime scenes and drug busts. Even after retiring I only subscribed to the Sunday paper, basically for the comics and the TV section. I watched world news but made a point of not watching on the weekend.

   

Until Sandy Hook happened. I’d missed the story completely. When messages started popping up on Face Book, I realized something major had happened. That’s the last time I skipped watching the nightly news. While some of my friends want to bury their heads in the sand, I want to stick my head up like a prairie dog and know what’s happening around me. Better to be informed and prepared than be oblivious. What you don’t know can hurt you.

Book Review: The Ornery Gene by Warren C. Embree @DownAndOutBooks

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Title: The Ornery Gene
Author: Warren C. Embree
Publisher: Down & Out Books
Publication Date: April 27, 2019
Genres: Mystery, Western

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Purchase Links:
Barnes & Noble // Kobo // Amazon
Indiebound // Down & Out Books

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The Ornery Gene
Warren C. Embree
Down & Out Books, April 2019
ISBN 978-1-64396-012-8
Trade Paperback

From the publisher—

When itinerant ranch hand Buck Ellison took a job with Sarah Watkins at her ranch in the Sandhills of Nebraska, he thought he had found the place where he could park his pickup, leave the past behind, and never move again.

On a rainy July night, a dead body at the south end of Sarah’s ranch forces him to become a reluctant detective, digging into the business of cattle breeding for rodeos and digging up events from his past that are linked to the circumstances surrounding the murder of Sam Danielson.

Working with his boss Sarah, her nephew Travis Martin, and the cook Diane Gibbons, Buck unmasks the murderer, but at the cost of learning the reality of past events that he chooses to keep to himself.

Now this was a refreshing change of pace in more ways than one. I don’t often read western-themed crime fiction, whether historical or contemporary, with the exception of some of the better known books and I found myself enjoying this one even though it’s a bit different.

Speaking of pace, that in itself is different from, say, Reacher or Longmire because those are more action-driven. There’s a good mystery here to be solved but it’s a pretty slow process, not that slow is necessarily a bad thing. I did think a little more oomph would be good but, at the same time, The Ornery Gene did bring to mind my own impression of cowboys as being somewhat laconic. That’s most likely an inaccurate assessment of cowboys considering how working on cattle ranches is not exactly living the life of Riley 😉

Another thing I appreciated was learning more than I already knew about breeding cattle and raising them for the rodeo. For those of us, like me, who live in a world pretty far removed from such things, the western way of life can be downright inviting.

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, August 2019.

An Excerpt from The Ornery Gene

CHAPTER ONE

Wednesday, 9:15 p.m.

Sam Danielson slowed his pickup to a stop beside an old cattle chute, switched off the engine, rolled the window all the way down, and listened. He absentmindedly counted the cricket chirps for ten seconds, added forty to the number of chirps and calculated it to be about sixty-five degrees or so outside. A trick his dad had taught him. It was a little chilly for July in this part of the hills, but he had heard the low rumbling of thunder on the drive out. It smelled like rain; there was a storm moving from the northeast that was cooling things down. There could even be some ice in it. He checked his watch: nine-fifteen. Just past twilight. He opened the pickup door and took a deep breath. He reached over, grabbed the flashlight from the glove box, and slid out of the driver’s seat onto the soft sand.

Off in the distance, he heard a mama cow lowing. This was the life he had chosen, and he had never looked back. It hadn’t been easy working for, and then with, his dad. They had gone back and forth on the best way to select the bulls and broncos they supplied for “rough stock” events at the rodeos in the Sandhills of western Nebraska. There was only one way for Dad. “You don’t have the feel for how much the bull don’t want rode,” his dad would say. But Sam had gone to school and studied twentieth-century methods of livestock rearing. For his dad it was a way of life; for Sam it was a business. Sam liked the numbers. He liked to narrow the odds by more than just a feeling. He had tried to show his dad the value in breeding techniques and genetic tracking in estimating the probability that a particular bull would do well in the arena. His dad would just laugh it off. “Show me the ornery gene,” his dad would laugh. “I’ll have five bulls picked before you decide on one.” But Sam knew his would be a better one than the five. He could prove the temperament of a bull before anyone tried to ride it. He had never convinced his dad. The ornery gene had been elusive, but not the genetic makeup of the ornery bulls. He had been right, and he had a genetically identifiable line of stock to prove it.

During his travels from his ranch outside of Laramie, Wyoming, Sam had been made aware of a genetic curiosity in one of the cattle he purchased in Colorado in the spring. Being off in the records would end up being off in the genetic makeup of the calves. There never was just one gene that made the difference. It was a matter of multiple generations. He had traced the lines that looked the most promising, and closely followed the leaders in the industry. Discovering that curiosity had led him into this part of the Sandhills of Nebraska. Talking about it at the bar had got him into an argument with the old cowboy, and listening to the old man had brought him to this particular spot.

“You’ll find what you’re looking for out there,” the old cowboy had said. “Then you’ll know I was telling you the truth.” Danielson switched the flashlight on and scanned the area around the cattle chute. He had let himself be convinced that the old man knew a thing or two about cattle breeding. What had surprised Danielson most was that the old man had known about the science behind modern breeding at all. The old cowboy looked more like he’d been “rode hard and put up wet” as his dad would have said: a man who had spent a hard life out in the sun and the rain and the snow. Danielson expected someone like that to know less about biogenetics and more about old school solutions. Like his dad.

The excitement the old cowboy had shown assured Danielson it would be worth his time to find out if he was headed in the right direction. But as he looked around the area, all he saw was a dump site for old batteries, tires, cook stoves, windmill parts, cans, bed springs, and used up corral panels. He saw nothing that would explain the old cowboy’s intensity. Now he was more curious to find out how the old cowboy would explain the genetic anomaly that he was so passionate about. It was one of those things his dad would say shouldn’t make a whole lot of difference in his deciding on a bull. It probably wasn’t all that important to breeders either. But he was curious, and keeping careful records was important to the integrity of breeding livestock.

It was a necessary component in the breeding business and his business. He was hoping he could find some answers out here as he tried to piece together the puzzle. He was determined to take some time to track it down to the source and maybe be able to verify when and where the mistake was made.

He had tried to be low-key when he was asking questions, but the speed at which the old cowboy had raised his hackles this afternoon showed Danielson just how hard that was going to be. He had touched the wrong nerve on the first try. He wasn’t sure whether he had asked the wrong question or his question had been taken the wrong way. It took a couple of beers and a good bit of time getting the old man calmed down. When it finally got friendly again, the old cowboy had told him about the spot out here in the hills. He gave directions and said he’d meet him out there around nine that evening.

As he waited for the old cowboy to show up, Danielson kicked at a broken pitman, picked it up, and used it to move around some cans at the edge of the dump site. He wasn’t terribly interested in getting bitten by a rattlesnake or a rat. It was a half-hearted effort. He sniffed the air again and caught the scent of pine and cedar trees this time. The hills hadn’t changed much from when he was a kid except the cedar trees. They were becoming a weed out in the hills. He shoved a wooden box with the pitman, then threw the stick of wood back into the pile. It was altogether possible that the old cowboy had sent him out on a snipe hunt. It just as well be. There was nothing he’d seen so far that was tied to the cattle breeding. If it were here, it wasn’t something obvious. What galled him was that he could be looking right at it and still not see it. For that matter, there could be nothing to it.

A loud clap of thunder caused Danielson to look up at the sky. In the southwest the clouds were fast turning to an ugly black. He saw the lightning streak across the sky and started counting. He reached fifty-two and he heard the thunder again. The storm was only about ten miles away. He didn’t want to get caught in the storm, and he hadn’t found anything yet. It wouldn’t be the first time he had gone on a wild goose chase.

He walked over to the rear of the pickup, pulled out a can of chewing tobacco from his back pocket, and stuffed a pinch in the back of his cheek. He put the can back in his pocket and picked up an old spur that was in the pickup box. He turned it over in his hand as he walked over to the chute—just an old spur. The old cowboy had given it to him, along with some old rodeo flyers, claiming he’d known Danielson’s dad and had got it from him. His dad had never been a bull rider, so the spur didn’t belong to him. He didn’t know whether someone had given it to his dad or his dad had simply found it tearing down after one of the rodeos they had supplied the bulls and broncs for. It reminded him that he needed to go through his dad’s things, a clutter of boxes, something he’d put off for ten years after his dad died. He tossed the spur toward the pickup box but hit the fender instead, bouncing the spur at an odd angle forward of the pickup. He walked over toward the cattle chute and battery and pointed his flashlight in the direction the spur had bounced.

Danielson caught the flash of lightning in the corner of his eye, heard a pop from behind him, then felt a sledgehammer hit him in the middle of the back. The strength drained out of his legs. He felt a sharp pain spring out from where the hammer had hit that seemed to rush through his torso. His legs gave out and he hit the ground, knees first, and then fell on his face. The pain was now a hot, burning sensation from the place where the hammer had hit and his back felt wet. He thought he had been struck with lightning, cursing himself for miscalculating the distance of the storm. He tried to use his arms to push himself up, but he couldn’t gather the strength. He dropped back down. He could feel that his back was soaked, but it hadn’t started raining yet.

From off to his right, he heard something moving cans around. It wasn’t the wind. It was deliberate. No animal would do that either. A few moments later, he felt someone kick his side. He grunted involuntarily, and then tried to roll over. His legs were a dead weight. He twisted his face away from the pickup, but couldn’t see anything. “He shot me,” he whispered. He tried to raise himself with his arms, but was light-headed now. I can’t believe he shot me. A few moments later rain poured from the clouds, diluting the blood from his back and mingling it with the sand.

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About the Author

WARREN EMBREE and his wife grew up in the Sandhills of Nebraska. He did both farm work and ranch work during those years, and he still keeps track of what goes on in the hills. After leaving the area, he pursued an academic career in English, Classical Languages, and Divinity. He lectured at a couple of institutions and preached at a few churches, and he now works in Lincoln as a data analyst for the University of Nebraska. His knowledge and love of the unique culture of the Sandhills, his education in languages and literature, and his analytical skills contribute to his story telling. He and his wife currently live in Nebraska and have 3 grown children.

Catch Up With Warren Embree On:
warrenembree.com, Goodreads, & Facebook!

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Follow the tour here.

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GIVEAWAY

This is a rafflecopter giveaway hosted by Partners in Crime
Virtual Book Tours for Warren C. Embree. There will be two (2)
giveaway winners.  Each winner will receive one (1) Amazon.com
Gift Card. The giveaway begins on August 1, 2019 and runs
through September 2, 2019. Void where prohibited.

Enter here.

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Book Review: Jealousy Filled Donuts by Ginger Bolton—and a Giveaway!

Jealousy Filled Donuts
Ginger Bolton
Kensington Books, September 2019
ISBN 978-1-4967-1191-5
Trade Paperback

It’s the Fourth of July and Emily Westhill is loving it. Not only does she get to drive her 1950 Ford “donut car” in the parade, with the King and Queen as passengers, her Deputy Donut Café is providing the donuts for the picnic later in the day. How fantastic can life get for a small-town girl making good?  Of course, it can only go downhill, at least in the immediate future. The Queen, a lovely diva named Taylor, decides that the “donut car” doesn’t meet her high standards and pitches a major fit (after the minor fit about how her hair was done) in front of God and everyone until she gets to ride in an acceptable car. Her best friend has some words to say about Taylor, although not where Taylor can hear her. Then Taylor is killed during the fireworks after the picnic. Emily’s donuts were stacked on a rocket-like firework in order to disguise it, and the rocket was deadly at close range. The pictures provided by a convenient photographer place Emily squarely in the frame, at least for a little while. This kind of in-your-face manipulation ups the ante and Emily becomes determined to find out who killed Taylor as well as why she was picked as the scapegoat.

Emily lives in a small town, with all the ramifications of small town life front and center. She’s a small business owner, sharing Deputy Donut Café with her deceased husband’s father, a former police chief. It’s great to have built-in clientele, and also connections that perhaps another amateur sleuth might not possess. It also means she has demands on her time, demands that can’t be ignored too often or for too long. Not to mention she does have a personal life, albeit one that could use a little help. Anyone who runs a business knows how much of a life it can overtake. Emily does her best within these constraints.

Bolton’s third entry in the Deputy Donut series is pretty good, for being as open to the whole “cops and donuts” humor. She doesn’t succumb to the obvious, although there is humor in the book. This is definitely a character-driven story, and Bolton knows how to drive this wagon. There are plenty of by-ways and side roads, although a perspicacious reader should have no trouble finding her way to the correct solution. The small-town insider solution is shared early enough for astute folks to catch on. And there is knitting involved – not enough to warrant a pattern at the end, to go with the recipes, and still a little bit of needlework is usually a good thing.

Reviewed by P.J. Coldren, June 2019.
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To enter the drawing for a print
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Jealousy Filled Donuts by Ginger Bolton,
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