Book Review: Threatened by Eliot Schrefer

ThreatenedThreatened
Eliot Schrefer
Scholastic Press, February 2014
ISBN 978-0-545-55143-4
Hardcover

I want to crawl into this book and live forever with Luc and “his” chimpanzees. Mr. Schrefer’s adoration and admiration of these astounding creatures is obvious and contagious. His complete understanding of the logistics as to why the chimpanzees must be wild animals is as evident as the tug of emotion that wishes it wasn’t so.

Threatened isn’t a glossy, glowing fantasy of strolling under canopies of trees, munching fresh fruit, arms happily swinging without a care in the world. Luc’s story is tragic and not unique. This is real. It is raw. And brutal. Harsh and stunning. This tiny tome is heart-breaking, soul wringing and world-shattering. But, most importantly, it is hopeful.

Our street-boy-turned-scientist-narrator, Luc is tough, courageous, bold and tenacious. He is sneaky, suspicious, starving, alone and abused. But kind. And emphatic. And hopeful, loving, open and intelligent. Uncannily, it seems the Professor gleans this as he sips mint tea and watches the scrawny boy wipe down tables in the seedy dive on Gabon’s main street in Africa.

The Prof is delightful, compassionate, sly, clever, brilliant and also…..sad at his core. The Egyptian Arab proudly proclaims to be embarking on an adventure to become Africa’s very own Jane Goodall. Of course, an assistant is required for his stay in the jungle. With slightly less than half of the population being under 15 years of age due to the AIDS epidemic (The Worm), the Professor hopes to employ a local boy.

Mr. Schrefer’s tale of two lost souls together in the jungle observing chimp behavior is breathtakingly beautiful. He perfectly captures Luc’s gradual, 180-degree change of heart and mind towards the chimpanzees in general, and one very captivating chimpanzee: Drummer, specifically. This author’s prose is thoughtful and thought-provoking. As if by magic, he combines infuriating, depressing facts with optimism, ambition and sweetly simple dreams.

While Threatened is indeed appropriate for Middle-Grade readers; this narrative, in Mr. Scherer’s words, transcends age. It should not be overlooked or dismissed by the Young Adult, New Adult, or even the Older-Than-Dirt Readers, like me. This is not the time for self-limiting. Missing out would be catastrophic.

Reviewed by jv poore, March 2015.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Book Review: Threatened by Eliot Schrefer

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s