Book Review: Taken by David Massey

Taken MasseyTaken
David Massey
Chicken House, August 2014
ISBN 978-0-545-66128-7
Hardcover

Understandably apprehensive, Rio focused on the yacht that would carry her and the five wounded veterans she’d yet to meet, around the planet. The mission of the self-described group of misfits isn’t just to prove that a disability doesn’t disable the individual. The true goal is raising money for the Hidden Children, kids whose families have been destroyed by war. As the “able-bodied” mate, Rio is confident in her sailing skills. As a civilian rather than a veteran, she hopes for the strength and resolve to genuinely contribute to the crew.

The badly burned Marcus uses outstanding humor to keep the crew relaxed. Rio adores his hilarious t-shirts that draw attention away from his stretched, scarred skin. The youngest soldier, Izzy, had fallen from a helicopter, shattering one of her legs. While being treated, it was discovered that she was diabetic and required daily insulin shots. Charis has both a gorgeous Welsh accent and a robotic arm.

Ash looked like a super-hero to Rio when she saw him on his blades-in-lieu-of-legs. His charm, intelligence and warmth stole her breath and stopped her heart. An endeavor of this magnitude, establishing relationships based on trust, would be paramount; looking for love…distracting. Make that dangerous. Jen, the one crew member to take an instant dislike to Rio, keeps a close watch on Ash.

The Lord’s Resistance Army which began in Uganda, touting their goal of ruling according to the biblical ten commandments has, in truth, broken each one. Moses Mwemba, 2nd in command of the LRA, views the disabled veterans’ mission as an opportunity to garner attention, thus notoriety. The Sangoma (Witch Doctor) will sabotage the ship. Once stalled, his young, crazed army will abduct the crew, and move them deep into the jungle. Huge ransoms will be demanded, but hardly the point.

Taken elicits tangible sensations. Heavy, humid air of the jungle is suffocating. The stench of spreading infection is stomach churning. Torture and gratuitous killings invoke horror, anger, and disbelief. Critical observations without prejudices poignantly present different points of view. Emotions aren’t mutually exclusive. Fear, anger and hatred towards the captors don’t necessarily override empathy, compassion or even an odd affinity for the half-starved, frightened, bark-munching child captors.

Mr. Massey brilliantly displays that stark fear, even coupled with harsh, deplorable, unimaginable conditions, can’t smother the basic human will to survive. He shows that through the absolute worst, most dismal of situations, life goes on. Kindness, compassion, selflessness, qualities not always evident, usually do exist, in most people.

Taken is not just an outstanding, exceptional book. The issues, terroristic groups, senseless acts of violence and killings are very real. Mr. Massey provides imperative education while simultaneously gifting a compelling story packed with clever characters, spot-on dialogue and thought-provoking prose.

Reviewed by jv poore, February 2015.

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3 thoughts on “Book Review: Taken by David Massey

    • Skye,
      Thank you for kind note about the review!
      I introduced this book to several High School classes and a few students echoed your sentiments.
      Fondly,
      jv

      • jv; Thank you for your honest review; too often reviewers praise and celebrate books and others come away disappointed.

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