Winners of the Great Big ARC Giveaway!

Congratulations to all these lucky winners!!


Sheila Boneham—Seven Princes by John R. Fultz (2012)—Under the watchful eye of the Giants, the kingdoms of Men rose to power. Now, the Giant-King has slain the last of the Serpents and ushered in an era of untold peace and prosperity. Where a fire-blackened desert once stood, golden cities flourish in verdant fields.  It is an Age of Heroes.  But the realms of Man face a new threat– an ancient sorcerer slaughters the rightful King of Yaskatha before the unbelieving eyes of his son, young Prince D’zan. With the Giant-King lost to a mysterious doom, it seems that no one has the power to stop the coming storm.  It is an Age of War.  The fugitive Prince seeks allies across the realms of Men and Giants to liberate his father’s stolen kingdom. Six foreign Princes are tied to his fate. Only one thing is certain: War is coming.

Sally Carpenter—Gift of the Bouda by Richard Farnsworth (2011)—Soldiers returning from the War on Terror bring back terrors of their own, and have trouble coping with normal life after combat. But few of these terrors are as tangible as those brought home by Special Forces Captain John Rogers, who is attacked by a lycanthrope. He survives but is infected by the curse. After returning to the real world, things fall apart for John. His wife divorces him and he struggles in the grip of this new affliction. He is finally able to get some sort of a life together when he accidentally hunts in the wrong territory and has a run-in with the local werewolf pack. Honey strips at the club where John works as a bouncer, when he’s not a monster. While moonlighting as a prostitute, she accidentally roles the wrong john. This john is carrying a package meant for a werewolf pack, and when they come looking for it they find John Rogers waiting.

Mary Welk—The Lost Angel by Javier Sierra (2011)—In approximately seventy-two hours, a little-known Middle Eastern terrorist group plans to bring about the end of the world. Convinced that they are the descendants of angels, they believe they are on the verge of at last being returned to heaven. Central to their plan is the kidnapping of Martin Faber, an undercover American scientist whose research has led him to an extraordinary secret. Martin’s only hope for survival is his young wife, Julia Alvarez–a woman born with a rare psychic gift. But she must find the courage to save her husband, all while running from religious extremists and clandestine government agencies.

thelma straw—Lethal by Sandra Brown (2011)—When her four year old daughter informs her a sick man is in their yard, Honor Gillette rushes out to help him. But that “sick” man turns out to be Lee Coburn, the man accused of murdering seven people the night before. Dangerous, desperate, and armed, he promises Honor that she and her daughter won’t be hurt as long as she does everything he asks. She has no choice but to accept him at his word.  But Honor soon discovers that even those close to her can’t be trusted. Coburn claims that her beloved late husband possessed something extremely valuable that places Honor and her daughter in grave danger. Coburn is there to retrieve it — at any cost. From FBI offices in Washington, D.C., to a rundown shrimp boat in coastal Louisiana, Coburn and Honor run for their lives from the very people sworn to protect them, and unravel a web of corruption and depravity that threatens not only them, but the fabric of our society.

Laurie Smith—Five O’Clock Follies by Theasa Tuohy (2012)—At a time when women rarely dreamed beyond careers as nurses, teachers or secretaries and certainly not as news reporters, a tall, enigmatic redhead arrives in Saigon. She is an object of great interest to the male correspondents, one of whom reports she arrived at Tan Son Nhut Airport wearing “high heeled bikini shoes.”  Few take her seriously as a reporter. To most, she is a trifle, a bobble, a lagniappe. Angela Martinelli survives a chopper crash, spends several days in the bunkers of the so-called Alamo Hilton during the siege of Khe Sanh, is captured briefly by the Viet Cong while trying to make her own way to the battle of Hue after being refused a hop on a military chopper because she isn’t male, and finally is badly wounded when a jeepload of other correspondents are killed in Cholon, the Chinese quarter of Saigon. Her life, loves and struggle to prove herself chronicle the deterioration of the war, the strategic battles around the Tet offensive, and the conflict raging back home over the conduct of the war. Not since Graham Greene has anyone captured so well the tedium and terror of reporting on war.

Donis Casey—Baited Blood by Sue Ann Jaffarian (2011)—Who’s murdering vampires in Los Angeles and throwing the bodies into the Dedhams’ pool? Each victim has been branded, a distinct mark that is the calling card of femme fatale vampire Ann Hayes. The contemptuous undead beauty declares her innocence, but can the vampires believe her? Has Ann returned to reclaim Doug Dedham, whom she once loved? Or is she being framed?Complicating matters are Madison’s burgeoning feelings for both sexy vampire Colin Reddy and fellow “beater” detective Mike Notchey. The stakes have never been higher as Madison and the vampires race to solve the mystery and stop the killer.

MalenaE—Skating Over the Line by Joelle Charbonneau (2011)—Rebecca Robbins is desperate to sell her inherited roller-skating rink in small-town Indian Falls, and—finally—she has a buyer. She can’t wait to head back to Chicago, especially now that her long delinquent father has blown back into town, but Lionel, her veterinarian boyfriend, thinks she should stay put. Also, the gang at the Senior Center wants her to track down the thief who’s been hot-wiring rusted-out classic cars. Unable to resist, Rebecca soon has the Sheriff’s Deputy threatening to arrest her for obstruction, and strange but scary men threatening her life. Then cars start exploding, with people in them, and Rebecca’s father goes missing. With the help of Pop, her Elvis-impersonating grandfather, Rebecca must find the pyromaniac car thief and put a stop to him—before he stops her first.

Cindy Blackburn—Skeleton Letters by Laura Childs (2011)—Is nothing sacred? The last thing Carmela Bertrand and her friend Ava expected to bear witness to in St. Tristan’s Church was a crime. But now a beloved member of their scrapbooking circle lies lifeless next to a smashed statue of St. Sebastien-and a mysterious hooded figure has absconded with an antique crucifix. As Carmela and Ava are drawn deeper into New Orleans’ French Quarter in search of the missing crucifix, they may need the help of more than a few patron saints. Because this is one killer they don’t want to cross…

Carol M—The Rope by Nevada Barr (2012)—In 1995 and 35 years old, fresh off the bus from New York City and nursing a broken heart, Anna Pigeon takes a decidedly unglamorous job as a seasonal employee of the Glen Canyon National Recreational Area. On her day off, Anna goes hiking into the park never to return. Her co-workers think she’s simply moved on–her cabin is cleaned out and her things gone. But Anna herself wakes up, trapped at the bottom of a dry natural well, naked, without supplies and no clear memory of how she found herself in this situation. As she slowly pieces together her memory, it soon becomes clear that someone has trapped her there, in an inescapable prison, and no one knows that she is even missing. Plunged into a landscape and a plot she is unfit and untrained to handle, Anna Pigeon must muster the courage, determination and will to live that she didn’t even know she still possessed to survive, outwit and triumph.

Terry Griffith—The Letter Q edited by Sarah Moon (2012)—Life-saving letters from a glittering wishlist of top authors.  If you received a letter from your older self, what do you think it would say? What do you wish it would say?  That the boy you were crushing on in History turns out to be gay too, and that you become boyfriends in college? That the bully who is making your life miserable will one day become so insignificant that you won’t remember his name until he shows up at your book signing?  In this anthology, sixty-three award-winning authors such as Michael Cunningham, Amy Bloom, Jacqueline Woodson, Gregory Maguire, David Levithan, and Armistead Maupin make imaginative journeys into their pasts, telling their younger selves what they would have liked to know then about their lives as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgendered people. Through stories, in pictures, with bracing honesty, these are words of love and understanding, reasons to hold on for the better future ahead. They will tell you things about your favorite authors that you never knew before. And they will tell you about yourself.

Joyce Kernan—Family Way by Michael Z. Lewin (2012)—Nation Day is a big deal on Walcot Street. Thousands of people gather to enjoy music, food, drink and the eclectic pleasures of a giant street party. But it s different for people who live on Walcot Street and have businesses to run. Like the Lunghi family and their detective agency. For them Nation Day must be endured, overcome and only peripherally enjoyed. This year Angelo must fight through the crowds to meet a new client. His sister, Rosetta, took the if-you-can’t-beat- em option and joined the organizing committee so now she s on troubleshooting duty. But who expected the trouble to include a dead body? Family Way is a gentle mystery set in modern-day Bath, England. But this is not the Bath of tourists and history. Instead, the story weaves together Nation Day events for all eight Lunghis, who have lived all or most of their lives in the small, beautiful and exotic English city.

Carol-Lynn Rossel—Killer Sweet Tooth by Gayle Trent (2011)—They say sugar is bad for your teeth, but can it actually kill you? The Brea Ridge police seem to think so when they find cake decorator Daphne Martin wielding an oversized plastic toothbrush over a dentist’s dead body. Daphne moved back to her small Virginia hometown just months ago to open her Daphne’s Delectable Cakes business and already she’s been mixed up in murder. Now she’s got to prove her sweet innocence again. After hours of police questioning, Daphne returns home to find Elvis Presley in her driveway. She’s certain she’s hallucinating until the leather-clad hunk orders up a pink Cadillac cake for a convention of the Elvis impersonators. Daphne accepts, but her reporter-boyfriend Ben is suspicious of Elvis’s intentions. Does the King want to make Daphne his confectionery queen? Or is the convention a ruse for a more sinister operation? Daphne’s own investigation into Dr. Bainsworth’s murder, meanwhile, reveals the dentist made as many enemies as he did fillings. Just about anyone could have done him in, but it’s up to Daphne to find the killer–and finish Elvis’s cake–before she’s the one singing “Jailhouse Rock.”

Marilyn Levinson—Behemoth by Scott Westerfeld (2010)—The behemoth is the fiercest creature in the British navy. It can swallow enemy battleships with one bite. The Darwinists will need it, now that they are at war with the Clanker powers. Deryn is a girl posing as a boy in the British Air Service, and Alek is the heir to an empire posing as a commoner. Finally together aboard the airship “Leviathan,” they hope to bring the war to a halt. But when disaster strikes the “Leviathan”‘s peacekeeping mission, they find themselves alone and hunted in enemy territory. Alek and Deryn will need great skill, new allies, and brave hearts to face what’s ahead.

CharlieF—Dust Lands: Blood Red Road by Moira Young (2011)—Saba has spent her whole life in Silverlake, a dried-up wasteland ravaged by constant sandstorms. The Wrecker civilization has long been destroyed, leaving only landfills for Saba and her family to scavenge from. That’s fine by her, as long as her beloved twin brother Lugh is around. But when a monster sandstorm arrives, along with four cloaked horsemen, Saba’s world is shattered. Lugh is captured, and Saba embarks on an epic quest to get him back. Suddenly thrown into the lawless, ugly reality of the world outside of desolate Silverlake, Saba is lost without Lugh to guide her. So perhaps the most surprising thing of all is what Saba learns about herself: she’s a fierce fighter, an unbeatable survivor, and a cunning opponent. And she has the power to take down a corrupt society from the inside. Teamed up with a handsome daredevil named Jack and a gang of girl revolutionaries called the Free Hawks, Saba stages a showdown that will change the course of her own civilization.

Barry Ergang—The Burning Wire by Jeffery Deaver (2010)—Lincoln Rhyme is back, on the trail of a killer whose weapon of choice cripples New York City with fear. The weapon is invisible and omnipresent. Without it, modern society grinds to a halt. It is electricity. The killer harnesses and steers huge arc flashes with voltage so high and heat so searing that steel melts and his victims are set afire. When the first explosion occurs in broad daylight, reducing a city bus to a pile of molten, shrapnel-riddled metal, officials fear terrorism. Rhyme, a world-class forensic criminologist known for his successful apprehension of the most devious criminals, is immediately tapped for the investigation. Long a quadriplegic, he assembles NYPD detective Amelia Sachs and officer Ron Pulaski as his eyes, ears and legs on crime sites, and FBI agent Fred Dellray as his undercover man on the street. As the attacks continue across the city at a sickening pace, and terrifying demand letters begin appearing, the team works desperately against time and with maddeningly little forensic evidence to try to find the killer. Or is it killers . . . ? Meanwhile, Rhyme is consulting on another high-profile investigation in Mexico with a most coveted quarry in his crosshairs: the hired killer known as the Watchmaker, one of the few criminals to have eluded Rhyme’s net. Juggling two massive investigations against a cruel ticking clock takes a toll on Rhyme’s health. Soon Rhyme is fighting on yet another front–and his determination to work despite his physical limitations threatens to drive away his closest allies when he needs them most . . .

Kay—The Miracle Stealer by Neil Connelly (2010)—Andi Grant adores her 6-year-old brother Daniel, a miracle child who fell down a mine shaft and survived. People regularly come to him for blessings and healings (which sometimes seem to work), and Andi is horrified by his exploitation, esp. when she finds signs of a stalker around their home. With the help of her once-and-maybe-future boyfriend Jeff, she comes up with a plan so audacious, so dramatic, it will stop the attention on Daniel forever: an Anti-Miracle that will unravel with the slightest examination of the facts, and cast doubt on Daniel’s powers forever after. As her plan comes together, the stalker draws closer, and the clock ticks toward Daniel’s star turn at the local Paradise Days celebration, Andi finds herself wrestling with her own beliefs in God and her brother, and wondering if what she really needs is . . . a miracle.

BrendaW—The Jane Austen Book Club by Karen Joy Fowler (2004)—In California’s central valley, five women and one man join to discuss Jane Austen’s novels. Over the six months they get together, marriages are tested, affairs begin, unsuitable arrangements become suitable, and love happens. Much of the charm lies in the book discussions themselves-never dry, ever revealing, always on the psychological mark-and much indeed also lies in the many perfect Austen-esque moments, situations, misunderstandings, recognitions, and reversals that make up the web and woof of the novel. We learn early that after 30 years of perfect marriage Sylvia’s husband has left her. That event, in one way or another, will touch on everyone, and before the end there’ll be a positively lovelyre-sorting of relationships, places, and positions, all done in today’s most perfect emulation of Jane that you could ever imagine.

Pat Reid—Kismet by Jakob Arjouni (2010)—Introducing Kemal Kayankaya, a wise-cracking private detective in Frankfurt – aka, “the ugliest town in Germany.” As a Turkish immigrant raised by Germans, he’s regularly subjected to racism in the gritty, working-class city, and getting work isn’t easy. So when his friend Romario asks Kayankaya to protect him against thugs demanding protection money from his restaurant business, the down-and-out Kayankaya takes the job. Except these are no ordinary thugs. They turn out to be battle-hardened Croatian nationalists looking to take over the rackets in Frankfurt, and they do not take kindly to Kayankaya’s interference with their plans. But try as he might, Kayankaya just can’t seem to stay out of their way …

Nancy G. West—Strip by Thomas Perry (2010)—An aging but formidable strip club owner, Claudiu “Manco” Kapak, is robbed by a masked gunman as he places his cash receipts in a bank’s night-deposit box. Enraged, he sends out half a dozen security men to find the witless culprit. Their search leads them to Joe Carver, an innocent but hardly defenseless newcomer who evades capture and sets out to make Kapak wish he’d targeted someone else. Meanwhile, the real burglar, Jefferson Davis Falkins, and his new girlfriend Carrie seem to believe they’ve found a whole new profession: robbing Manco Kapak. Lieutenant Nick Slosser, the police detective in charge of the puzzling and increasingly violent case, has his own troubles, including worries about how he’s going to afford to send the oldest child of each of his two bigamous marriages to college without making their mothers suspicious. As this strange series of events explodes into a triple killing, Carver finds himself in the middle of a brewing gang war over Kapak’s little empire, while Falkins and Carrie journey into territory more dangerous than they could have ever imagined.

Judy Donofrio—The Killing Moon by N. K. Jemisin (2012)—The city burned beneath the Dreaming Moon. In the ancient city-state of Gujaareh, peace is the only law. Upon its rooftops and amongst the shadows of its cobbled streets wait the Gatherers – the keepers of this peace. Priests of the dream-goddess, their duty is to harvest the magic of the sleeping mind and use it to heal, soothe . . . and kill those judged corrupt. But when a conspiracy blooms within Gujaareh’s great temple, Ehiru – the most famous of the city’s Gatherers – must question everything he knows. Someone, or something, is murdering dreamers in the goddess’ name, stalking its prey both in Gujaareh’s alleys and the realm of dreams. Ehiru must now protect the woman he was sent to kill – or watch the city be devoured by war and forbidden magic.

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And congratulations also go to these recent giveaway winners—

Kelly Ann T.—The Dog Who Knew Too Much by Spencer Quinn
Malena E.—Death of a Schoolgirl by Joanna Campbell Slan(and a T-shirt)
Katie Menees—Through a Yellow Wood by Carolyn J. Rose
Warren Bull—Caravan of Thieves by David Rich
Penny Tuttle—Artifact by Gigi Pandian