Book Review: A Prom to Remember by Sandy Hall

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Title: A Prom to Remember
Author: Sandy Hall
Publisher: Swoon Reads
Publication Date: April 24, 2018
Genre: General Fiction, Young Adult

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Purchase Links:
Barnes & Noble // Kobo // iBooks 
Amazon // Indiebound

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A Prom to Remember
Sandy Hall
Swoon Reads, April 2018
ISBN 978-1-250-11914-8
Hardcover

From the publisher—

Cora: Dating Perfect Boyfriend Jamie. Has NO IDEA how to break up with him…

Paisley: Anti-prom. Somehow nominated her anxiety-ridden best friend for prom king…

Henry: Hates social situations. Invited to prom by the most popular girl in school. SEND HELP!

Otis: Half of one of the cutest couples in his class. Not quite ready for a post-prom hotel room…

Lizzie: Shy. Excited to go to prom. With a boy. Whose name she doesn’t know.

Cameron: Loner. Over high school. Just wants to meet the mysterious girl who’s been leaving him notes…

Jacinta: Unnamed Nerd Girl #3. Determined to become the star of her own life, starting with prom…

Back in the very long ago day, prom wasn’t a big thing in my life. In my junior year, I was dating an R.O.T.C. cadet from another school and we went to his Ring Dance the same night. I don’t remember what I was doing in my senior year but, for whatever reason, I didn’t go to prom. Still, that particular school dance was a big deal and, judging by the kids I see in their fancy dress having dinner, limos waiting, it still reigns supreme in high school today.

What I haven’t forgotten in all these years is all the angst and excitement and hopes and dreams that go along with prom and A Prom to Remember brought it all back with a look at seven kids and all their expectations. I came to love every one of these teens for one reason or another and would not have minded spending more time with them. This was a really fun read and I turned the last page grinning to beat the band…a good way to end a book, I think 😉

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, April 2018.

About the Author

I’m a teen librarian from New Jersey where I was born and raised. I have a BA in Communication and a Master of Library and Information Science from Rutgers University. When I’m not writing, or teen librarian-ing, I enjoy reading, slot machines, marathoning TV shows, and long scrolls through Tumblr. A LITTLE SOMETHING DIFFERENT is my first novel.

Author links:  Website // Twitter // Goodreads

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Follow the tour here.

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Book Review: Hell to Pay by Rachel Amphlett

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Title: Hell to Pay
Series: A Detective Kay Hunter Novel #4
Author: Rachel Amphlett
Narrator: Alison Campbell
Publisher: Saxon Publishing
Publication Date: January 2018

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Purchase Links:
The Author // Audible // iTunes // Amazon

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Hell to Pay
A Detective Kay Hunter Novel #4
Rachel Amphlett
Narrated by Alison Campbell
Saxon Publishing, January 2018
Downloaded Unabridged Audiobook

From the publisher—

When a road traffic accident on a dark autumn night uncovers a disturbing conspiracy, Detective Sergeant Kay Hunter’s investigation exposes a ruthless serial killer exploiting vulnerable young women.

With her enemies unmasked and her career spiraling out of control, Kay’s determination to seek vengeance for the victims brings her dangerously close to those who want to silence her.

Undeterred, she uncovers the real reason behind a plot to destroy her career and sets in motion a terrifying chain of events.

When Detective Sergeant Kay Hunter is called out late at night by DI Devon Sharp, she wonders why a car accident requires their presence but then Sharp shows her the arm dangling out of the boot. Clearly, the owner of the arm didn’t belong there and the detectives soon learn that the young woman may have been dead when she was put in the boot or may have died in the accident. Whichever it is, something is definitely offkilter but they have no idea where their investigation will take them.

Two years earlier, Kay had been accused of causing the police to have to release a dangerous criminal and, ever since, she has been trying to find out who set her up and has been determined to bring Jozef Demiri to justice. As the current case heats up, she and her colleagues discover some very ugly activities including sex trafficking and murder but also what appears to be corruption within the police, all somehow connected to Demiri. At the same time, Kay becomes painfully aware that she herself is being spied upon but she has no idea who could be doing that and the answers may not come before it’s too late.

In the three previous Kay Hunter books, there is a level of intensity that keeps those stories moving at a rapid pace. That same intensity is here in Hell to Pay but it’s heightened by a deep emotional current running throughout, affecting more than just Kay. Still, Kay is the one who made me sniffle a time or two and I really sympathized with her roiling feelings, especially regarding her lost baby.

Narrator Alison Campbell gets better and better with each book and her easy tone and near-perfect voices make these terrific stories a pleasure to listen to.

I’m sorry this four book tour is coming to an end now; I’ve come to think of these characters as old friends, friends I would like to know in reality. Kay is a warmhearted and trusting person who has had that trust damaged but she never loses sight of her responsibilities and her desire to make things right in the world. I’ll miss her and her husband, Adam, as well as her colleagues—Sharp, Barnes, Carys, Gavin—but wait! I don’t have to say goodbye just yet as the fifth book, Call to Arms, came out last month and I can hardly wait to start.

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, April 2018.

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About the Author

Before turning to writing, Rachel Amphlett played guitar in bands, worked as a TV and film extra, dabbled in radio as a presenter and freelance producer for the BBC, and worked in publishing as a sub-editor and editorial assistant.

She now wields a pen instead of a plectrum and writes crime fiction and spy novels, including the Dan Taylor espionage novels and the Detective Kay Hunter series.

Originally from the UK and currently based in Brisbane, Australia, Rachel cites her writing influences as Michael Connelly, Lee Child, and Robert Ludlum. She’s also a huge fan of Peter James, Val McDermid, Robert Crais, Stuart MacBride, and many more.

She’s a member of International Thriller Writers and the Crime Writers Association, with the Italian foreign rights for her debut novel, White Gold sold to Fanucci Editore’s TIMECrime imprint, and the first four books in the Dan Taylor espionage series contracted to Germany’s Luzifer Verlag.

Website // Twitter // Facebook // Goodreads // Instagram

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About the Narrator

I’m a Bristol-based actress who trained at Bretton Hall and the University of Leeds. I’ve been involved with a huge range of projects and love a bit of variety of life!

I’m lucky to be a verstile performer – think everything  from Shakespeare, to  interactive theatre, comedy, solo shows and a whole host of different voice work.

I’m experienced in devising, improvisation, multi-roleing, immersive theatre and voice acting,

​I have a lot of fun performing across the UK and round the world with the award-winning Natural Theatre, specialising in immersive, interactive theatre in surprising places.

​I also teach youth theatre, facilitate theatre workshops and am experienced in corporate roleplay and presenting.

​I’m represented by Louise Alexander at BAM Associates.

Website

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Play an excerpt here.

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Follow the tour here.

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Book Reviews: Infamy by Robert K. Tanenbaum and Robert B. Parker’s The Hangman’s Sonnet by Reed Farrel Coleman

Infamy
A Butch Karp-Marlene Ciampi Thriller #28
Robert K. Tanenbaum
Pocket Books, March 2017
ISBN 978-1-4767-9321-4
Mass Market Paperback

This novel is not up to the usual standards of the author.  Usually, the first half of the book recounts a situation which sets the stage for the other half, which, ordinarily, few do better than Mr. Tanenbaum: a dramatic courtroom scene.  So it is with Infamy.  Unfortunately, however otherwise well-written the novel is, the courtroom scene is flat and perfunctory.

The novel opens with an intelligence raid by a secret U.S. Army unit in Syria which was supposed to capture at least one suspect.  Instead, they find the suspect had shot and murdered other important enemy subjects and obtained important documents which point to a conspiracy to evade sanctions on ISIS and Iraqi oil.  Butch Karp, the New York DA and protagonist of the series, enters the plot when a U.S. Army Colonel is shot and killed in Central Park, and slowly a conspiracy begins to unfold.

There are all sorts of subplots and side issues which add little to the tale, except to make it more complicated than it really is.  This reader was clearly disappointed, especially when the author decided to vent his own political views, sometimes crudely or bluntly chastising those holding conservative views.  It’s too bad, because basically Infamy began with a solid idea, but lost its way along the way from front cover to back cover.

Reviewed by Ted Feit, December 2017.

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Robert B. Parker’s The Hangman’s Sonnet
A Jesse Stone Novel #16
Reed Farrel Coleman
G. P. Putnam’s Sons, September 2017
ISBN 978-0-3991-7144-4
Hardcover

This is the fourth Jesse Stone novel Reed Farrel Coleman has written in the series begun by the late Robert B. Parker.  And he has kept the faith.  Moreover, he has done something the master never did.  He brings in Spenser to play a minor role in solving the mystery which begins with the death of an old woman, a member of the founding family of Paradise, and the ransacking of her home.

Jesse, still reeling from the death of his beloved Diana in his presence, is slowly drinking himself into oblivion.  But that doesn’t stop him from performing his duty as Police Chief, despite the hindrance of the Mayor and her hatchet woman.  The plot basically revolves around the recovery of a supposedly long lost tape made by a now has-been rock star in time for his 70th birthday party.

Coleman performs up to the standards of the late master, while offering a clever plot of his own, written in a slightly different style (few can duplicate the pithy sentences of a Parker novel).  He gives us a deeper insight into Jesse’s personality and presumably shows the force of his iron will.  Well at least let’s hope so.  Presumably we’ll find out in the next volume in the series.

Recommended.

Reviewed by Ted Feit, December 2017.

Book Review: The Elizas by Sara Shepard

The Elizas
Sara Shepard
Atria, April 2018
ISBN 978-1-5011-6277-0
Hardcover

From the publisher—

When debut novelist Eliza Fontaine is found at the bottom of a hotel pool, her family at first assumes that it’s just another failed suicide attempt. But Eliza swears she was pushed, and her rescuer is the only witness.

Desperate to find out who attacked her, Eliza takes it upon herself to investigate. But as the publication date for her novel draws closer, Eliza finds more questions than answers. Like why are her editor, agent, and family mixing up events from her novel with events from her life? Her novel is completely fictional, isn’t it?

The deeper Eliza goes into her investigation while struggling with memory loss, the closer her life starts to resemble her novel, until the line between reality and fiction starts to blur and she can no longer tell where her protagonist’s life ends and hers begins.

The Elizas is an interesting kind of crime fiction in that much of the story has the protagonist, Eliza, questioning her own mental faculties and the reader is just as baffled as she is. Eliza isn’t very likeable—some of her behavior, particularly in the past, can be called unpleasant at best—and most of us are not saintly enough to blithely overlook some aspects of mental issues so connecting with her takes patience and effort. After all, having someone in our lives who may or may not be psychologically damaged is just not easy but I did sympathize with Eliza as she struggled to understand what was real and what wasn’t.

There’s a scene near the end that I wondered about because it seemed so unlikely; a police detective tells Eliza something about the authorities not doing an autopsy and it struck me as a strange accommodation for the police to make. Perhaps the approach is different in Los Angeles and I was just unaware.

The impact this novel could have had on me was lessened somewhat by the use of first person present tense. I know many other readers feel otherwise but I just don’t understand why any crime fiction author does this. Instead of heightening the tension, it pulls me out of the story because (1) unless something supernatural is going to happen, I know the speaker is going to survive so I really don’t need to worry and (2) I can’t help wondering how the protagonist is telling the story as he runs down the street, gun blazing. But then that’s just me and I’m quite sure others will find this perfect for the reader who wants a thriller that is less intense than so many.

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, April 2018.

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Purchase Links:
Barnes & Noble // Kobo // iBooks
Google Play // Books-A-Million
Amazon // Indiebound // Simon & Schuster

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About the Author

credit Danielle Shields

Sara Shepard is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Pretty Little Liars series. She has also written other Young Adult series and novels, including The Lying Game, The Heiresses, and The Perfectionists. Sara now lives in Pittsburgh with her family.

Find Sara:

Website
Twitter
Instagram

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“A story blending Hitchcock,  S.J. Watson, and Ruth Ware.”
—Entertainment Weekly (EW.com)

 

“Shepard brings her knack for the tightly-wound thriller that
earned Pretty Little Liars its runaway success to a whole new
demographic… Clever and attention-grabbing, this is one book
you won’t be able to leave sitting on the nightstand for long.”
—Harper’s Bazaar, 10 New Books to Add to Your Reading List in 2018

 

“With a cast of dodgy characters and twists you won’t see coming,
the New York Times bestselling author of Pretty Little Liars
will keep you on your toes until the very last page.”
—Redbook, 14 Books You Won’t Want to Miss in 2018

Discuss |8 Reasons Why Adults Should Read Young Adult Fiction

I do my best to convince skeptics to read Young Adult but Bentley at Book Bastion makes a really good case for it.

Alternative title for baby-boomers: “sh*t a millennial book blogger says.” 
Image result for lillian gif


Its inevitable that readers face a lot of scrutiny from the general public for our chosen hobby – especially from people who might not totally understand why we choose to read the books we read.

When I introduce myself as book blogger to someone who doesn’t read for fun, I get a lot of the standard questions, but the most popular is probably – What genres do you read/review? 

Those of you who know me well, know that fantasy and Young Adult fiction are my mainstays. They are the genres I return to time after time and will probably never get tired of. However, I’ve noticed that when you’re an adultin his 20-somethings,telling a non-reader that you like reading fiction written for teens and young adults, people often look at you like you have three heads. 

Image result for say what gif

I’ve even…

View original post 1,023 more words

Location, Location, Location—and a Giveaway!

Lauren Carr is the international best-selling author of the Mac Faraday, Lovers in Crime, and Thorny Rose Mysteries—over twenty titles across three fast-paced mystery series filled with twists and turns!

Now, Lauren has added one more hit series to her list with the Chris Matheson Cold Case Mysteries. Set in the quaint West Virginia town of Harpers Ferry, Ice introduces Chris Matheson, a retired FBI agent, who joins forces with other law enforcement retirees to heat up those cold cases that keep them up at night.

Book reviewers and readers alike rave about how Lauren Carr’s seamlessly crosses genres to include mystery, suspense, crime fiction, police procedurals, romance, and humor.

Lauren is a popular speaker who has made appearances at schools, youth groups, and on author panels at conventions. She lives with her husband, and three dogs on a mountain in Harpers Ferry, WV.

Visit Lauren’s websites and blog at:

E-Mail: writerlaurencarr@gmail.net
Website: http://mysterylady.net/
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/lauren.carr.984991
Gnarly’s Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/GnarlyofMacFaradayMysteries
Lovers in Crime Facebook Page:
http://www.facebook.com/LoversInCrimeMysteries?ref=ts&fref=ts
Acorn Book Services Facebook Page:
https://www.facebook.com/AcornBookServices?ref=hl
Twitter: @TheMysteryLadie

When it comes to a series –

Location, Location, Location Is Everything!

Back when I was nineteen years old, I sat down to write the Great American Tragedy, a 900+ page debut novel.

Setting: Hollywood.

Granted, I had never been west of the Mississippi, but that was where I wanted to be and the book was fiction, so that was where I set it. Today, that manuscript is stuffed in an attic some place where it will never see the light of day.

One of the first things writing instructors teach is to write what you know. I had never been to Hollywood, so all I knew about it was what I saw in the movies. I was from a small town in West Virginia. Who’d want to read a murder mystery set there? I wanted a murder mystery set in Hollywood, baby!

Now that I have grown a bit—I hope—I have learned a few things about settings, particularly when it has to do with settings for mystery novels, especially series.

More goes into a setting than time and place. Setting encompasses the feel of the location, which can have a direct effect on your characters.

Try to imagine Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn set in New York City during that same time period. Yes, there’s a river to drift down on a raft. Huck would end up being a street urchin living in an alley instead of a shack along a river. The shack along the river is much quainter than an alley in New York City. It would have been a completely different book.

When plotting a murder mystery, I take a number of factors into consideration when deciding on the setting. Is it dirty and smoggy? Or is the sky blue and the air fresh? Are the victim and those connected to him or her caring? Or are they so self-absorbed that they curse the dead body blocking their path to the nearest Starbucks? The answers to these questions contribute to my decision of which setting I select for the mystery.

My Lovers in Crime Mystery series is set in and around Chester, West Virginia—one of those small towns where everyone knows everyone. Most of the population are senior citizens or their grown children who have returned to the nest after having been out there in the real world. It’s home. Folks don’t just know who you are, but they most likely know who your father was and what teacher you had in the fourth grade. People are friendly. Neighbors help their neighbors. The air is fresh. The pace is casual.

That is a complete contrast to the Thorny Rose detectives. Jessica Faraday and Murphy Thornton are a young married couple who live in northern Virginia just outside Washington, DC. Murphy works at the Pentagon. In the opening scene for my current work in progress, a Thorny Rose Mystery, Murphy is navigating Friday evening rush hour, which launches the fast-paced plot. Chester has a rush minute. Big difference.

The Joshua Thornton/Lovers in Crime was my first mystery series, created after I had grown up to embrace my small-town roots. After a few installments in the series, I discovered that while the charming characters and feel are striking to readers, the limited setting can stretch a murder mystery reader’s suspension of disbelief to the breaking point.

Example: Every cozy mystery fan loves the television series, “It’s Murder, She Wrote”. I’ve seen every episode. If you’re a fan, you’ll recall that rather quickly, Jessica Fletcher started encountering mysteries while on book tours or visiting friends in other parts of the world, with only a few episodes happening in Cabot Cove. As a matter of fact, she even moved to New York City. Why? Because the small town of Cabot Cove was becoming the murder capital of the world. Mystery fans started making jokes about never visiting Cabot Cove because you won’t get out alive. So, the writers moved Jessica to New York City where a murder every week was more believable.

Not only does the location and atmosphere contribute to the setting, but so do the people who live there. As I had mentioned, the people who live in and around Chester, West Virginia, have roots in that area. Everyone knows everyone. A murder in Chester is a true whodunit. While there may be strangers or outsiders, they are few.

Set in the upper-class suburbs across the Potomac River from the Nation’s Capital, the Thorny Rose detectives encounter wholly different types of murder victims and suspects. In a town filled with movers and shakers, folks here are ambitious and busy. Neighbors don’t necessarily know each other—and if they do—they most likely don’t care. The Thorny Rose Mysteries offers the perfect setting for sophisticated murders involving glitzy glamourous characters with the dark metropolitan underbelly.

Sometimes, I’m in the mood for a small-town mystery with a big city setting. Enter the Chris Matheson Cold Case Mystery series.

Chris Matheson lives on the family farm along the Shenandoah River in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. Don’t let the state name fool you. In the eastern panhandle of West Virginia, Harpers Ferry is considered part of the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. Trains packed with commuters travel into Union Station in Washington every morning to take folks living in the eastern panhandle to jobs in and around the capital.

In the twenty-five years that I have lived here in Harpers Ferry, I have seen a tidal wave of professionals moving out of the city in search of a more family friendly atmosphere to raise their children.

Being a farm girl myself, it’s frustrating to understand those folks who specifically move out of the city because they want to move to the country, and then expect the country folks to adapt to their big city ways. As a rule, you can take the girl out of the country, but you can’t take the country out of the girl. From what I have seen, for some folks, you can take them out of the city, but you can’t take the city out of the folks.

I’ve also seen families who’ve made West Virginia their home for several generations. I’m still struggling with trying to figure out how to make homemade bread, by hand, without a bread maker. Some town’s people welcome the growth, while others resent the outsiders.

Such is the perfect mixture of rural and urban character to create a multitude of conflict for a mystery series.

Chris Matheson, the protagonist in my newest series, is a mixture of the two groups—a growing dynamic I have observed. He was born and raised in Harpers Ferry. Then, he took advantage of the opportunities offered to him and went out to see the world. First, he served in the military. Then, he became an investigator with the FBI. Now, retired, he moves his family back home. He has been in both worlds, which gives him an ability to maneuver back and forth between the two types of folks while working a case.

Upon returning to Harpers Ferry to work his family farm, he becomes friends with other law enforcement retirees. That is another population group who have found their way into this setting. The lower taxes in West Virginia have made the area a popular retirement spot. Their diverse law enforcement experiences make for a vast pool of storylines to choose from. The quaint setting, with a proximity to the bustling Washington DC metropolis, makes my writer’s mind spin with possible plotlines and a vast array of characters to include.

Chris Matheson and his team, the Geezer Squad, tackle their first cold case, a close to the heart missing person’s case, in Ice.

I promise you, this won’t be the last.

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To enter the drawing for an audiobook
download copy
of Ice by Lauren Carr,
just leave a comment
recommending a
mystery with a very intriguing or unique
setting (that means not New York City or
Hollywood!)
The winning name will be

drawn on Tuesday evening, April 24th.


Hot off the press!

Book Review: One to Watch by Rachel Amphlett

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Title: One to Watch
Series: A Detective Kay Hunter Novel #3
Author: Rachel Amphlett
Narrator: Alison Campbell
Publisher: Saxon Publishing
Publication Date: October 3, 2017

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Purchase Links:
The Author // Audible // iTunes // Amazon

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One to Watch
A Detective Kay Hunter Novel #3
Rachel Amphlett
Narrated by Alison Campbell
Saxon Publishing, October 2017
Downloaded Unabridged Audiobook

From the publisher—

Sophie Whittaker shared a terrifying secret. Hours later, she was dead.

Detective Kay Hunter and her colleagues are shocked by the vicious murder of a teenage girl at a private party in the Kentish countryside.

A tangled web of dark secrets is exposed as twisted motives point to a history of greed and corruption within the tight-knit community.

Confronted by a growing number of suspects and her own enemies who are waging a vendetta against her, Kay makes a shocking discovery that will make her question her trust in everyone she knows.

At a large country estate in Kent, a teenaged girl is murdered at a private party and Detective Kay Hunter and her colleagues are shocked at the brutality of the crime and at the reactions of the people involved. Sophie was the daughter of a snooty British aristocrat and her more mild-mannered husband and the party was intended to celebrate a rather odd ceremony for Sophie, one of purity. Some of the tenets of this purity pledge carried their own very creepy tones, not least of which is the idea that the teen girl must be chaste until marriage but the teen boy is forgiven all his behavior once they marry.

This particular crime is a lot more difficult to investigate than some because of the roadblocks put in the team’s way due to the wealth and position of the various parties. DI Sharp assigns Kay and Barnes to follow certain leads while other detectives look into different aspects of the murder but each path brings them to confusing tangents that introduce ever more urgent questions. All the while, DCI Larch seems to be bent on protecting the sensibilities of Sophie’s family as well as another family whose American money apparently make them off limits.

It soon becomes obvious that this is no “routine” killing and an ultra-conservative religious program is in the mix along with greed on all sides while two very different young men are devastated by Sophie’s death…or are they? Could a major secret have been the impetus for the crime and just who was Sophie, anyway? Meanwhile, Kay is still trying to conduct her own investigation into why someone wants to destroy her career and she and her husband, Adam, begin to see that this could ultimately be much more dangerous than they initially thought.

All the characters I’ve come to like so much, and even one or two I don’t like so much, are back in this series entry and I really enjoyed the time I spent with them and the investigative efforts needed to solve this awful murder, sunk in a bog of corruption that is as unpleasant and distasteful as can be.

Once again, narrator Alison Campbell pulled me in with her outstanding work and she is fast becoming one of my favorite audiobook readers. It doesn’t hurt that she had such a good story to work with and the entire series so far has kept me riveted. For anyone looking for a British police procedural series on audio, you cannot do better than this one 😉

Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, April 2018.

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About the Author

Before turning to writing, Rachel Amphlett played guitar in bands, worked as a TV and film extra, dabbled in radio as a presenter and freelance producer for the BBC, and worked in publishing as a sub-editor and editorial assistant.

She now wields a pen instead of a plectrum and writes crime fiction and spy novels, including the Dan Taylor espionage novels and the Detective Kay Hunter series.

Originally from the UK and currently based in Brisbane, Australia, Rachel cites her writing influences as Michael Connelly, Lee Child, and Robert Ludlum. She’s also a huge fan of Peter James, Val McDermid, Robert Crais, Stuart MacBride, and many more.

She’s a member of International Thriller Writers and the Crime Writers Association, with the Italian foreign rights for her debut novel, White Gold sold to Fanucci Editore’s TIMECrime imprint, and the first four books in the Dan Taylor espionage series contracted to Germany’s Luzifer Verlag.

Website // Twitter // Facebook // Goodreads // Instagram

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About the Narrator

I’m a Bristol-based actress who trained at Bretton Hall and the University of Leeds. I’ve been involved with a huge range of projects and love a bit of variety of life!

I’m lucky to be a verstile performer – think everything  from Shakespeare, to  interactive theatre, comedy, solo shows and a whole host of different voice work.

I’m experienced in devising, improvisation, multi-roleing, immersive theatre and voice acting,

I have a lot of fun performing across the UK and round the world with the award-winning Natural Theatre, specialising in immersive, interactive theatre in surprising places.

I also teach youth theatre, facilitate theatre workshops and am experienced in corporate roleplay and presenting.

I’m represented by Louise Alexander at BAM Associates

Website

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Play an excerpt here.

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Follow the tour here.

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